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Effects of rest-duration, time-of-day and their interaction on periodic leg movements while awake in restless legs syndrome.
Sleep Med. 2005 Sep; 6(5):429-34.SM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

The diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome (RLS) indicate that both time-of-day and rest effects induce or aggravate symptoms. Periodic limb movements while awake (PLMW) provide an objective motor sign of RLS that can be measured during an awake suggested immobilization test (SIT). This study uses the SIT at different times of the day and analyzes time-of-day and duration-of-rest effects and their interaction on the PLMW.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Twenty-eight RLS patients who were not on medications had SIT tests at 10 pm, 8 am and 4 pm on two consecutive days. PLMW for each 20-min period were analyzed for time-of-day and rest effects and their interaction. PLMW increase from the first to last 20-min SIT period assessed the rest-effects.

RESULTS

Significant effects were found for rest, time-of-day and rest-time-of-day interaction. The rest-effect increased most from morning to afternoon while total PLMW increased more from afternoon to night. Males compared to females had significantly more PLMW and a larger rest-effect change with time-of-day.

CONCLUSIONS

Rest and time-of-day effects and their interaction all increase RLS symptoms. PLMW increase with rest may provide a sensitive measure of symptom severity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Asthma and Allergy Bldg 1B76b, 5501 Hopkins Bayview Circle, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. richardjhu@aol.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16099215

Citation

Allen, Richard P., et al. "Effects of Rest-duration, Time-of-day and Their Interaction On Periodic Leg Movements While Awake in Restless Legs Syndrome." Sleep Medicine, vol. 6, no. 5, 2005, pp. 429-34.
Allen RP, Dean T, Earley CJ. Effects of rest-duration, time-of-day and their interaction on periodic leg movements while awake in restless legs syndrome. Sleep Med. 2005;6(5):429-34.
Allen, R. P., Dean, T., & Earley, C. J. (2005). Effects of rest-duration, time-of-day and their interaction on periodic leg movements while awake in restless legs syndrome. Sleep Medicine, 6(5), 429-34.
Allen RP, Dean T, Earley CJ. Effects of Rest-duration, Time-of-day and Their Interaction On Periodic Leg Movements While Awake in Restless Legs Syndrome. Sleep Med. 2005;6(5):429-34. PubMed PMID: 16099215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of rest-duration, time-of-day and their interaction on periodic leg movements while awake in restless legs syndrome. AU - Allen,Richard P, AU - Dean,Terry, AU - Earley,Christopher J, PY - 2004/08/27/received PY - 2005/05/13/revised PY - 2005/05/18/accepted PY - 2005/8/16/pubmed PY - 2006/2/8/medline PY - 2005/8/16/entrez SP - 429 EP - 34 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 6 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome (RLS) indicate that both time-of-day and rest effects induce or aggravate symptoms. Periodic limb movements while awake (PLMW) provide an objective motor sign of RLS that can be measured during an awake suggested immobilization test (SIT). This study uses the SIT at different times of the day and analyzes time-of-day and duration-of-rest effects and their interaction on the PLMW. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight RLS patients who were not on medications had SIT tests at 10 pm, 8 am and 4 pm on two consecutive days. PLMW for each 20-min period were analyzed for time-of-day and rest effects and their interaction. PLMW increase from the first to last 20-min SIT period assessed the rest-effects. RESULTS: Significant effects were found for rest, time-of-day and rest-time-of-day interaction. The rest-effect increased most from morning to afternoon while total PLMW increased more from afternoon to night. Males compared to females had significantly more PLMW and a larger rest-effect change with time-of-day. CONCLUSIONS: Rest and time-of-day effects and their interaction all increase RLS symptoms. PLMW increase with rest may provide a sensitive measure of symptom severity. SN - 1389-9457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16099215/Effects_of_rest_duration_time_of_day_and_their_interaction_on_periodic_leg_movements_while_awake_in_restless_legs_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1389-9457(05)00139-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -