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Extended interhuman transmission of monkeypox in a hospital community in the Republic of the Congo, 2003.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2005 Aug; 73(2):428-34.AJ

Abstract

This report describes the first reported outbreak of human monkeypox in the Republic of Congo. Eleven confirmed and probable monkeypox cases were observed during this outbreak, all were less than 18 years old, and most resided on the grounds of the Government Hospital in Impfondo. Molecular, virologic, and serologic, and diagnostic assays were used to detect evidence of monkeypox (or orthopox) virus infection in individuals with striking dermatologic and other clinical manifestations. The majority of cases in this outbreak experienced significant, symptomatic illnesses; there was one death, possibly involving secondary complications, and one instance of profound sequelae. Up to six sequential transmissions of monkeypox virus from person to person are hypothesized to have occurred, making this the longest uninterrupted chain of human monkeypox fully documented to date. The pattern of sustained human-to-human transmission observed during this outbreak may influence our current perception of the capacity for this zoonotic virus to adapt to humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16103616

Citation

Learned, Lynne A., et al. "Extended Interhuman Transmission of Monkeypox in a Hospital Community in the Republic of the Congo, 2003." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 73, no. 2, 2005, pp. 428-34.
Learned LA, Reynolds MG, Wassa DW, et al. Extended interhuman transmission of monkeypox in a hospital community in the Republic of the Congo, 2003. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2005;73(2):428-34.
Learned, L. A., Reynolds, M. G., Wassa, D. W., Li, Y., Olson, V. A., Karem, K., Stempora, L. L., Braden, Z. H., Kline, R., Likos, A., Libama, F., Moudzeo, H., Bolanda, J. D., Tarangonia, P., Boumandoki, P., Formenty, P., Harvey, J. M., & Damon, I. K. (2005). Extended interhuman transmission of monkeypox in a hospital community in the Republic of the Congo, 2003. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 73(2), 428-34.
Learned LA, et al. Extended Interhuman Transmission of Monkeypox in a Hospital Community in the Republic of the Congo, 2003. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2005;73(2):428-34. PubMed PMID: 16103616.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extended interhuman transmission of monkeypox in a hospital community in the Republic of the Congo, 2003. AU - Learned,Lynne A, AU - Reynolds,Mary G, AU - Wassa,Demole Wassa, AU - Li,Yu, AU - Olson,Victoria A, AU - Karem,Kevin, AU - Stempora,Linda L, AU - Braden,Zach H, AU - Kline,Richard, AU - Likos,Anna, AU - Libama,François, AU - Moudzeo,Henri, AU - Bolanda,Jean Daniel, AU - Tarangonia,Paul, AU - Boumandoki,Paul, AU - Formenty,Pierre, AU - Harvey,Joseph M, AU - Damon,Inger K, PY - 2005/8/17/pubmed PY - 2005/10/12/medline PY - 2005/8/17/entrez SP - 428 EP - 34 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 73 IS - 2 N2 - This report describes the first reported outbreak of human monkeypox in the Republic of Congo. Eleven confirmed and probable monkeypox cases were observed during this outbreak, all were less than 18 years old, and most resided on the grounds of the Government Hospital in Impfondo. Molecular, virologic, and serologic, and diagnostic assays were used to detect evidence of monkeypox (or orthopox) virus infection in individuals with striking dermatologic and other clinical manifestations. The majority of cases in this outbreak experienced significant, symptomatic illnesses; there was one death, possibly involving secondary complications, and one instance of profound sequelae. Up to six sequential transmissions of monkeypox virus from person to person are hypothesized to have occurred, making this the longest uninterrupted chain of human monkeypox fully documented to date. The pattern of sustained human-to-human transmission observed during this outbreak may influence our current perception of the capacity for this zoonotic virus to adapt to humans. SN - 0002-9637 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16103616/Extended_interhuman_transmission_of_monkeypox_in_a_hospital_community_in_the_Republic_of_the_Congo_2003_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4855 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -