Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fetal, infant and childhood growth: relationships with body composition in Brazilian boys aged 9 years.
Int J Obes (Lond) 2005; 29(10):1192-8IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Early growth rate has been linked to later obesity categorised by body mass index (BMI), but the development of body composition has rarely been studied.

METHODS

We tested the hypotheses that (1) birthweight and weight gain in (2) infancy or (3) childhood are associated with later body composition, in 172 Brazilian boys followed longitudinally since birth. Growth was assessed using measurements of weight and height at birth, 6 months, and 1 and 4 y. Measurements at 9 y comprised height, weight and body composition using foot-foot impedance.

RESULTS

Birthweight was associated with later height and lean mass (LM), but not fatness. Weight gain 0-6 months was associated with later height and LM, and with obesity prevalence according to BMI, but not with fatness. Weight gain 1-4 y was associated with later fatness and LM. Weight gain 4-9 y was strongly associated with fatness but not LM. Early growth rate did not correlate positively with subsequent growth rate.

CONCLUSIONS

Early rapid weight gain increased the risk of later obesity, but not through a direct effect on fatness. Childhood weight gain remained the dominant risk factor for later obesity. The reported link between early growth and later obesity may be due partly to hormonal programming, and partly to the contribution of LM to obesity indices based on weight and height. Whether our findings apply to other populations requires further research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC Childhood Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Child Health, London UK. J.Wells@ich.ucl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16103893

Citation

Wells, J C K., et al. "Fetal, Infant and Childhood Growth: Relationships With Body Composition in Brazilian Boys Aged 9 Years." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 29, no. 10, 2005, pp. 1192-8.
Wells JC, Hallal PC, Wright A, et al. Fetal, infant and childhood growth: relationships with body composition in Brazilian boys aged 9 years. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(10):1192-8.
Wells, J. C., Hallal, P. C., Wright, A., Singhal, A., & Victora, C. G. (2005). Fetal, infant and childhood growth: relationships with body composition in Brazilian boys aged 9 years. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 29(10), pp. 1192-8.
Wells JC, et al. Fetal, Infant and Childhood Growth: Relationships With Body Composition in Brazilian Boys Aged 9 Years. Int J Obes (Lond). 2005;29(10):1192-8. PubMed PMID: 16103893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fetal, infant and childhood growth: relationships with body composition in Brazilian boys aged 9 years. AU - Wells,J C K, AU - Hallal,P C, AU - Wright,A, AU - Singhal,A, AU - Victora,C G, PY - 2005/8/17/pubmed PY - 2006/3/7/medline PY - 2005/8/17/entrez SP - 1192 EP - 8 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 29 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Early growth rate has been linked to later obesity categorised by body mass index (BMI), but the development of body composition has rarely been studied. METHODS: We tested the hypotheses that (1) birthweight and weight gain in (2) infancy or (3) childhood are associated with later body composition, in 172 Brazilian boys followed longitudinally since birth. Growth was assessed using measurements of weight and height at birth, 6 months, and 1 and 4 y. Measurements at 9 y comprised height, weight and body composition using foot-foot impedance. RESULTS: Birthweight was associated with later height and lean mass (LM), but not fatness. Weight gain 0-6 months was associated with later height and LM, and with obesity prevalence according to BMI, but not with fatness. Weight gain 1-4 y was associated with later fatness and LM. Weight gain 4-9 y was strongly associated with fatness but not LM. Early growth rate did not correlate positively with subsequent growth rate. CONCLUSIONS: Early rapid weight gain increased the risk of later obesity, but not through a direct effect on fatness. Childhood weight gain remained the dominant risk factor for later obesity. The reported link between early growth and later obesity may be due partly to hormonal programming, and partly to the contribution of LM to obesity indices based on weight and height. Whether our findings apply to other populations requires further research. SN - 0307-0565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16103893/Fetal_infant_and_childhood_growth:_relationships_with_body_composition_in_Brazilian_boys_aged_9_years_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803054 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -