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Geologic constraints on the macroevolutionary history of marine animals.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Aug 30; 102(35):12326-31.PN

Abstract

The causes of mass extinctions and the nature of taxonomic radiations are central questions in paleobiology. Several episodes of taxonomic turnover in the fossil record, particularly the major mass extinctions, are generally thought to transcend known biases in the geologic record and are widely interpreted as distinct macroevolutionary phenomena that require unique forcing mechanisms. Here, by using a previously undescribed compilation of the durations of sedimentary rock sequences, I compare the rates of expansion and truncation of preserved marine sedimentary basins to rates of origination and extinction among Phanerozoic marine animal genera. Many features of the highly variable record of taxonomic first and last occurrences in the marine animal fossil record, including the major mass extinctions, the frequency distribution of genus longevities, and short- and long-term patterns of genus diversity, can be predicted on the basis of the temporal continuity and quantity of preserved sedimentary rock. Although these results suggest that geologically mediated sampling biases have distorted macroevolutionary patterns in the fossil record, preservation biases alone cannot easily explain the extent to which the sedimentary record duplicates paleobiological patterns. Instead, these results suggest that the processes responsible for producing variability in the sedimentary rock record, such as plate tectonics and sea-level change, may have been dominant and consistent macroevolutionary forces throughout the Phanerozoic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geological Sciences and Museum of Paleontology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA. shananp@umich.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16105949

Citation

Peters, Shanan E.. "Geologic Constraints On the Macroevolutionary History of Marine Animals." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, no. 35, 2005, pp. 12326-31.
Peters SE. Geologic constraints on the macroevolutionary history of marine animals. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005;102(35):12326-31.
Peters, S. E. (2005). Geologic constraints on the macroevolutionary history of marine animals. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(35), 12326-31.
Peters SE. Geologic Constraints On the Macroevolutionary History of Marine Animals. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Aug 30;102(35):12326-31. PubMed PMID: 16105949.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Geologic constraints on the macroevolutionary history of marine animals. A1 - Peters,Shanan E, Y1 - 2005/08/16/ PY - 2005/8/18/pubmed PY - 2005/10/14/medline PY - 2005/8/18/entrez SP - 12326 EP - 31 JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America JO - Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A VL - 102 IS - 35 N2 - The causes of mass extinctions and the nature of taxonomic radiations are central questions in paleobiology. Several episodes of taxonomic turnover in the fossil record, particularly the major mass extinctions, are generally thought to transcend known biases in the geologic record and are widely interpreted as distinct macroevolutionary phenomena that require unique forcing mechanisms. Here, by using a previously undescribed compilation of the durations of sedimentary rock sequences, I compare the rates of expansion and truncation of preserved marine sedimentary basins to rates of origination and extinction among Phanerozoic marine animal genera. Many features of the highly variable record of taxonomic first and last occurrences in the marine animal fossil record, including the major mass extinctions, the frequency distribution of genus longevities, and short- and long-term patterns of genus diversity, can be predicted on the basis of the temporal continuity and quantity of preserved sedimentary rock. Although these results suggest that geologically mediated sampling biases have distorted macroevolutionary patterns in the fossil record, preservation biases alone cannot easily explain the extent to which the sedimentary record duplicates paleobiological patterns. Instead, these results suggest that the processes responsible for producing variability in the sedimentary rock record, such as plate tectonics and sea-level change, may have been dominant and consistent macroevolutionary forces throughout the Phanerozoic. SN - 0027-8424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16105949/Geologic_constraints_on_the_macroevolutionary_history_of_marine_animals_ L2 - http://www.pnas.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16105949 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -