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Occipital neuralgia secondary to respiratory tract infection.
J Orofac Pain. 2005 Summer; 19(3):261-4.JO

Abstract

Occipital neuralgia is an extracranial pain that may be confused with other headaches. It can be attributed to multiple causes. The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman suffering from right occipital neuralgia secondary to respiratory tract infection that began 6 days before the pain started. The patient suffered from a sharp and burning pain with paroxysms in the right occipital region and at the top of the right ear. Sensation was decreased in the affected area, and hypersensitivity to touch and cold water was also noted. Tinel's sign was present, and local anesthetic block produced pain relief. The combination of gabapentin and amitriptyline did not provide significant pain relief but led to marked adverse effects. Carbamazepine (300 mg/d) was required for pain control. A month later the patient appeared totally pain-free. The treatment was continued for 3 months, and the patient remained pain-free over a subsequent follow-up period of more than 6 months. Thus, in the case of occipital pain, a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough history are necessary to obtain the correct diagnosis and to choose the appropriate treatment plan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology (Division of Oral Therapeutics), Medical School, University of Athens, Greece. cmourouzis@ath.forthnet.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16106720

Citation

Mourouzis, Constantinos, et al. "Occipital Neuralgia Secondary to Respiratory Tract Infection." Journal of Orofacial Pain, vol. 19, no. 3, 2005, pp. 261-4.
Mourouzis C, Saranteas T, Rallis G, et al. Occipital neuralgia secondary to respiratory tract infection. J Orofac Pain. 2005;19(3):261-4.
Mourouzis, C., Saranteas, T., Rallis, G., Anagnostopoulou, S., & Tesseromatis, C. (2005). Occipital neuralgia secondary to respiratory tract infection. Journal of Orofacial Pain, 19(3), 261-4.
Mourouzis C, et al. Occipital Neuralgia Secondary to Respiratory Tract Infection. J Orofac Pain. 2005;19(3):261-4. PubMed PMID: 16106720.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Occipital neuralgia secondary to respiratory tract infection. AU - Mourouzis,Constantinos, AU - Saranteas,Theodosios, AU - Rallis,George, AU - Anagnostopoulou,Sophia, AU - Tesseromatis,Christina, PY - 2005/8/19/pubmed PY - 2005/11/3/medline PY - 2005/8/19/entrez SP - 261 EP - 4 JF - Journal of orofacial pain JO - J Orofac Pain VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - Occipital neuralgia is an extracranial pain that may be confused with other headaches. It can be attributed to multiple causes. The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman suffering from right occipital neuralgia secondary to respiratory tract infection that began 6 days before the pain started. The patient suffered from a sharp and burning pain with paroxysms in the right occipital region and at the top of the right ear. Sensation was decreased in the affected area, and hypersensitivity to touch and cold water was also noted. Tinel's sign was present, and local anesthetic block produced pain relief. The combination of gabapentin and amitriptyline did not provide significant pain relief but led to marked adverse effects. Carbamazepine (300 mg/d) was required for pain control. A month later the patient appeared totally pain-free. The treatment was continued for 3 months, and the patient remained pain-free over a subsequent follow-up period of more than 6 months. Thus, in the case of occipital pain, a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough history are necessary to obtain the correct diagnosis and to choose the appropriate treatment plan. SN - 1064-6655 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16106720/Occipital_neuralgia_secondary_to_respiratory_tract_infection_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -