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Stimulus induced desynchronization of human auditory 40-Hz steady-state responses.
J Neurophysiol. 2005 Dec; 94(6):4082-93.JN

Abstract

The hypothesis that gamma-band oscillations are related to the representation of an environmental scene in the cerebral cortex after binding of corresponding perceptual elements is currently under discussion. One question is how the sensory system reacts to a fast change in the scene if perceptual elements are rigidly bound together. A reset of the gamma-band oscillation forced by a change in sensory input may dissolve the binding, which then would be re-established for the new sensation. We studied the reset of gamma-band oscillations on the 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) by means of whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG). The rhythm of 40-Hz AM of a 500-Hz tone evoked the ASSR, and a short noise burst served as a concurrent stimulus. Possible direct interactions of the auditory stimuli were excluded by presenting the noise impulse in a different frequency channel (2,000-3,000 Hz) to the contralateral ear. The concurrent stimulus induced a considerable decrement in the amplitude of ASSR, which was localized in primary auditory cortices. This decrement lasted 250 ms and was significantly longer than the duration of the transient gamma-band response evoked by the noise burst. Thus it could not be explained by any linear superimposition of the responses. The time courses of ASSR amplitude and phase during recovery from the decrement resembled those after stimulus onset, indicating that a new ASSR was built up after the resetting stimulus. The results are discussed as reset of oscillations in human thalamocortical networks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16107530

Citation

Ross, B, et al. "Stimulus Induced Desynchronization of Human Auditory 40-Hz Steady-state Responses." Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 94, no. 6, 2005, pp. 4082-93.
Ross B, Herdman AT, Pantev C. Stimulus induced desynchronization of human auditory 40-Hz steady-state responses. J Neurophysiol. 2005;94(6):4082-93.
Ross, B., Herdman, A. T., & Pantev, C. (2005). Stimulus induced desynchronization of human auditory 40-Hz steady-state responses. Journal of Neurophysiology, 94(6), 4082-93.
Ross B, Herdman AT, Pantev C. Stimulus Induced Desynchronization of Human Auditory 40-Hz Steady-state Responses. J Neurophysiol. 2005;94(6):4082-93. PubMed PMID: 16107530.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stimulus induced desynchronization of human auditory 40-Hz steady-state responses. AU - Ross,B, AU - Herdman,A T, AU - Pantev,C, Y1 - 2005/08/17/ PY - 2005/8/19/pubmed PY - 2006/1/26/medline PY - 2005/8/19/entrez SP - 4082 EP - 93 JF - Journal of neurophysiology JO - J Neurophysiol VL - 94 IS - 6 N2 - The hypothesis that gamma-band oscillations are related to the representation of an environmental scene in the cerebral cortex after binding of corresponding perceptual elements is currently under discussion. One question is how the sensory system reacts to a fast change in the scene if perceptual elements are rigidly bound together. A reset of the gamma-band oscillation forced by a change in sensory input may dissolve the binding, which then would be re-established for the new sensation. We studied the reset of gamma-band oscillations on the 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) by means of whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG). The rhythm of 40-Hz AM of a 500-Hz tone evoked the ASSR, and a short noise burst served as a concurrent stimulus. Possible direct interactions of the auditory stimuli were excluded by presenting the noise impulse in a different frequency channel (2,000-3,000 Hz) to the contralateral ear. The concurrent stimulus induced a considerable decrement in the amplitude of ASSR, which was localized in primary auditory cortices. This decrement lasted 250 ms and was significantly longer than the duration of the transient gamma-band response evoked by the noise burst. Thus it could not be explained by any linear superimposition of the responses. The time courses of ASSR amplitude and phase during recovery from the decrement resembled those after stimulus onset, indicating that a new ASSR was built up after the resetting stimulus. The results are discussed as reset of oscillations in human thalamocortical networks. SN - 0022-3077 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16107530/Stimulus_induced_desynchronization_of_human_auditory_40_Hz_steady_state_responses_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/jn.00469.2005?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -