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Neural evidence of effects of emotional valence on word recognition.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2005 Sep; 57(3):165-73.IJ

Abstract

There are no clear reports of electrophysiological evidence of the facilitating effect of negative valence on word recognition. However, behavioral psychological studies have suggested that negative words can be recognized more accurately than positive and neutral words. This study aimed to examine whether, and if so how, the valence of words could influence accuracy and event-related potentials (ERPs) in a recognition task. ERPs were recorded from 20 healthy subjects during performance of a word recognition task. We found a behavioral advantage in discriminability between old and new items for negative words. As for ERPs, the positive-going shift was evident for correct responses to targets in late latency at midline and left centro-parietal sites. Additionally, the magnitude of this component was greatest for negative targets, next for positive targets, and least for neutral targets. The findings offer support for the idea that negative content greatly accelerates recognition memory compared to positive and neutral words.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nagoya University Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Chikusa-ku, Japan. midoriinaba@sd.starcat.ne.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16109287

Citation

Inaba, Midori, et al. "Neural Evidence of Effects of Emotional Valence On Word Recognition." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 57, no. 3, 2005, pp. 165-73.
Inaba M, Nomura M, Ohira H. Neural evidence of effects of emotional valence on word recognition. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;57(3):165-73.
Inaba, M., Nomura, M., & Ohira, H. (2005). Neural evidence of effects of emotional valence on word recognition. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 57(3), 165-73.
Inaba M, Nomura M, Ohira H. Neural Evidence of Effects of Emotional Valence On Word Recognition. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;57(3):165-73. PubMed PMID: 16109287.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neural evidence of effects of emotional valence on word recognition. AU - Inaba,Midori, AU - Nomura,Michio, AU - Ohira,Hideki, Y1 - 2005/03/19/ PY - 2004/04/22/received PY - 2004/10/06/revised PY - 2005/01/03/accepted PY - 2005/8/20/pubmed PY - 2006/1/5/medline PY - 2005/8/20/entrez SP - 165 EP - 73 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 57 IS - 3 N2 - There are no clear reports of electrophysiological evidence of the facilitating effect of negative valence on word recognition. However, behavioral psychological studies have suggested that negative words can be recognized more accurately than positive and neutral words. This study aimed to examine whether, and if so how, the valence of words could influence accuracy and event-related potentials (ERPs) in a recognition task. ERPs were recorded from 20 healthy subjects during performance of a word recognition task. We found a behavioral advantage in discriminability between old and new items for negative words. As for ERPs, the positive-going shift was evident for correct responses to targets in late latency at midline and left centro-parietal sites. Additionally, the magnitude of this component was greatest for negative targets, next for positive targets, and least for neutral targets. The findings offer support for the idea that negative content greatly accelerates recognition memory compared to positive and neutral words. SN - 0167-8760 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16109287/Neural_evidence_of_effects_of_emotional_valence_on_word_recognition_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(05)00036-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -