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Loracarbef (LY163892) versus amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.
Clin Ther. 1992 Mar-Apr; 14(2):214-29.CT

Abstract

In this single-blind study, 579 patients with chronic bronchitis were randomly assigned to receive 400 mg of loracarbef twice daily or 500/125 mg of amoxicillin/clavulanate thrice daily for seven days. Treatment efficacy was evaluated in 129 of the loracarbef-treated patients and 120 amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients in whom pretreatment positive cultures of pathogens susceptible to both antibiotics were isolated. Three organisms predominated in either pure or mixed cultures in 57.0% of the evaluable patients: Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis; H influenzae was isolated in 25.0% of the patients with single pathogens. Among the evaluable patients, favorable clinical responses (cure or improvement) were noted in 93.8% of the loracarbef-treated patients and in 95.0% of the amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients. A favorable bacteriologic response (pathogen eliminated or presumed eliminated) was found in 82.2% of loracarbef-treated patients and 90.0% of amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients. Six patients in the loracarbef group and 14 in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group discontinued treatment because of adverse events. The events were judged to be drug related in four loracarbef-treated patients and in 11 amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients. The incidence of diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly more frequent in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group (13.5% and 5.6%) than in the loracarbef group (4.5% and 1.7%), while the incidence of severe headaches was significantly more frequent in the loracarbef than the amoxicillin/clavulanate group (7.2% vs 3.1%). It is concluded that loracarbef and amoxicillin/clavulanate are safe and effective in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1611645

Citation

Zeckel, M L., et al. "Loracarbef (LY163892) Versus Amoxicillin/clavulanate in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis." Clinical Therapeutics, vol. 14, no. 2, 1992, pp. 214-29.
Zeckel ML, Jacobson KD, Guerra FJ, et al. Loracarbef (LY163892) versus amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Clin Ther. 1992;14(2):214-29.
Zeckel, M. L., Jacobson, K. D., Guerra, F. J., Therasse, D. G., & Farlow, D. (1992). Loracarbef (LY163892) versus amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Clinical Therapeutics, 14(2), 214-29.
Zeckel ML, et al. Loracarbef (LY163892) Versus Amoxicillin/clavulanate in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis. Clin Ther. 1992 Mar-Apr;14(2):214-29. PubMed PMID: 1611645.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Loracarbef (LY163892) versus amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. AU - Zeckel,M L, AU - Jacobson,K D, AU - Guerra,F J, AU - Therasse,D G, AU - Farlow,D, PY - 1992/3/1/pubmed PY - 1992/3/1/medline PY - 1992/3/1/entrez SP - 214 EP - 29 JF - Clinical therapeutics JO - Clin Ther VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - In this single-blind study, 579 patients with chronic bronchitis were randomly assigned to receive 400 mg of loracarbef twice daily or 500/125 mg of amoxicillin/clavulanate thrice daily for seven days. Treatment efficacy was evaluated in 129 of the loracarbef-treated patients and 120 amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients in whom pretreatment positive cultures of pathogens susceptible to both antibiotics were isolated. Three organisms predominated in either pure or mixed cultures in 57.0% of the evaluable patients: Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis; H influenzae was isolated in 25.0% of the patients with single pathogens. Among the evaluable patients, favorable clinical responses (cure or improvement) were noted in 93.8% of the loracarbef-treated patients and in 95.0% of the amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients. A favorable bacteriologic response (pathogen eliminated or presumed eliminated) was found in 82.2% of loracarbef-treated patients and 90.0% of amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients. Six patients in the loracarbef group and 14 in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group discontinued treatment because of adverse events. The events were judged to be drug related in four loracarbef-treated patients and in 11 amoxicillin/clavulanate-treated patients. The incidence of diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly more frequent in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group (13.5% and 5.6%) than in the loracarbef group (4.5% and 1.7%), while the incidence of severe headaches was significantly more frequent in the loracarbef than the amoxicillin/clavulanate group (7.2% vs 3.1%). It is concluded that loracarbef and amoxicillin/clavulanate are safe and effective in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. SN - 0149-2918 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1611645/Loracarbef__LY163892__versus_amoxicillin/clavulanate_in_the_treatment_of_acute_bacterial_exacerbations_of_chronic_bronchitis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -