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Teen twin pregnancies: differences in fetal growth outcomes among blacks and whites.
Am J Perinatol 2005; 22(6):335-9AJ

Abstract

We set out to determine the magnitude of black-white disparity in intrauterine fetal growth inhibition among twin births to teenagers (age 15 to 19) in the United States using a retrospective cohort study design. We compared the risk for low and very low birthweight, preterm and very preterm, and small for gestational age between black and white twins born to teen mothers during the period 1995 through 1998. The methodology of generalized estimating equations was used to adjust for the presence of intracluster correlation within twin pairs. A total of 29,307 individual twins were analyzed. For all fetal growth indices examined, infants born to black mothers remained disadvantaged except for preterm birth, for which the risk was comparable to that of whites (adjusted OR, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95 to 1.11). The racial gap was most marked for low birthweight (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.19, 1.37]) and very low birthweight (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.42). Black twins had an equal level of elevated risk for very preterm and small for gestational age (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.27 and OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.28, respectively). In conclusion, we found significant differences in fetal growth parameters between black and white twins born to teen gravidas. Our findings confirm similar black disadvantage reported for singletons. Current prevention strategies aimed at reducing adverse fetal outcomes among teenagers in the United States need to consider the heightened risk among neonates born to black mothers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16118724

Citation

Salihu, Hamisu M., et al. "Teen Twin Pregnancies: Differences in Fetal Growth Outcomes Among Blacks and Whites." American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 22, no. 6, 2005, pp. 335-9.
Salihu HM, Aliyu MH, Sedjro JE, et al. Teen twin pregnancies: differences in fetal growth outcomes among blacks and whites. Am J Perinatol. 2005;22(6):335-9.
Salihu, H. M., Aliyu, M. H., Sedjro, J. E., Nabukera, S., Oluwatade, O. J., & Alexander, G. R. (2005). Teen twin pregnancies: differences in fetal growth outcomes among blacks and whites. American Journal of Perinatology, 22(6), pp. 335-9.
Salihu HM, et al. Teen Twin Pregnancies: Differences in Fetal Growth Outcomes Among Blacks and Whites. Am J Perinatol. 2005;22(6):335-9. PubMed PMID: 16118724.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Teen twin pregnancies: differences in fetal growth outcomes among blacks and whites. AU - Salihu,Hamisu M, AU - Aliyu,Muktar H, AU - Sedjro,Jeanine E, AU - Nabukera,Sarah, AU - Oluwatade,Olatunji J, AU - Alexander,Greg R, PY - 2005/8/25/pubmed PY - 2005/12/15/medline PY - 2005/8/25/entrez SP - 335 EP - 9 JF - American journal of perinatology JO - Am J Perinatol VL - 22 IS - 6 N2 - We set out to determine the magnitude of black-white disparity in intrauterine fetal growth inhibition among twin births to teenagers (age 15 to 19) in the United States using a retrospective cohort study design. We compared the risk for low and very low birthweight, preterm and very preterm, and small for gestational age between black and white twins born to teen mothers during the period 1995 through 1998. The methodology of generalized estimating equations was used to adjust for the presence of intracluster correlation within twin pairs. A total of 29,307 individual twins were analyzed. For all fetal growth indices examined, infants born to black mothers remained disadvantaged except for preterm birth, for which the risk was comparable to that of whites (adjusted OR, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95 to 1.11). The racial gap was most marked for low birthweight (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.19, 1.37]) and very low birthweight (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.42). Black twins had an equal level of elevated risk for very preterm and small for gestational age (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.27 and OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.28, respectively). In conclusion, we found significant differences in fetal growth parameters between black and white twins born to teen gravidas. Our findings confirm similar black disadvantage reported for singletons. Current prevention strategies aimed at reducing adverse fetal outcomes among teenagers in the United States need to consider the heightened risk among neonates born to black mothers. SN - 0735-1631 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16118724/Teen_twin_pregnancies:_differences_in_fetal_growth_outcomes_among_blacks_and_whites_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2005-871658 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -