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Snoring predicts hyperactivity four years later.
Sleep. 2005 Jul; 28(7):885-90.S

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

Cross-sectional studies implicate snoring and sleep-disordered breathing as potential contributors to hyperactive behavior in some children. However, no prospective cohort study has demonstrated that symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing precede development of hyperactivity.

PARTICIPANTS

Parents of 229 children aged 2 to 13 years, recruited at 2 general pediatrics clinics, completed initial and 4-year follow-up surveys.

MEASUREMENTS

Surveys included a validated Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire about snoring, sleepiness, and overall risk of sleep-disordered breathing, and the hyperactivity index (expressed as a T-score) within the Conners' Parent Rating Scale.

RESULTS

Thirty children (13%) were rated as hyperactive (hyperactivity index > 60) at follow-up. After adjustment for hyperactivity at baseline and stimulant use at follow-up, hyperactivity at follow-up was predicted by baseline habitual snoring (odds ratio = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [1.3, 14.7]) or loud snoring (4.5, [1.2, 17.5]) and by top-quartile composite scores for snoring (5.3, [1.7, 16.8]), sleepiness (3.0, [1.0, 9.4]), or sleep-disordered breathing (4.0, [1.4, 11.6]).

CONCLUSIONS

This 4-year prospective cohort study shows that snoring and other symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing are strong risk factors for future emergence or exacerbation of hyperactive behavior. These findings support the hypothesis that untreated childhood sleep-disordered breathing contributes to development of hyperactivity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. chervin@umich.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16124670

Citation

Chervin, Ronald D., et al. "Snoring Predicts Hyperactivity Four Years Later." Sleep, vol. 28, no. 7, 2005, pp. 885-90.
Chervin RD, Ruzicka DL, Archbold KH, et al. Snoring predicts hyperactivity four years later. Sleep. 2005;28(7):885-90.
Chervin, R. D., Ruzicka, D. L., Archbold, K. H., & Dillon, J. E. (2005). Snoring predicts hyperactivity four years later. Sleep, 28(7), 885-90.
Chervin RD, et al. Snoring Predicts Hyperactivity Four Years Later. Sleep. 2005;28(7):885-90. PubMed PMID: 16124670.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Snoring predicts hyperactivity four years later. AU - Chervin,Ronald D, AU - Ruzicka,Deborah L, AU - Archbold,Kristen Hedger, AU - Dillon,James E, PY - 2005/8/30/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/8/30/entrez SP - 885 EP - 90 JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 28 IS - 7 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: Cross-sectional studies implicate snoring and sleep-disordered breathing as potential contributors to hyperactive behavior in some children. However, no prospective cohort study has demonstrated that symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing precede development of hyperactivity. PARTICIPANTS: Parents of 229 children aged 2 to 13 years, recruited at 2 general pediatrics clinics, completed initial and 4-year follow-up surveys. MEASUREMENTS: Surveys included a validated Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire about snoring, sleepiness, and overall risk of sleep-disordered breathing, and the hyperactivity index (expressed as a T-score) within the Conners' Parent Rating Scale. RESULTS: Thirty children (13%) were rated as hyperactive (hyperactivity index > 60) at follow-up. After adjustment for hyperactivity at baseline and stimulant use at follow-up, hyperactivity at follow-up was predicted by baseline habitual snoring (odds ratio = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [1.3, 14.7]) or loud snoring (4.5, [1.2, 17.5]) and by top-quartile composite scores for snoring (5.3, [1.7, 16.8]), sleepiness (3.0, [1.0, 9.4]), or sleep-disordered breathing (4.0, [1.4, 11.6]). CONCLUSIONS: This 4-year prospective cohort study shows that snoring and other symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing are strong risk factors for future emergence or exacerbation of hyperactive behavior. These findings support the hypothesis that untreated childhood sleep-disordered breathing contributes to development of hyperactivity. SN - 0161-8105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16124670/Snoring_predicts_hyperactivity_four_years_later_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/sleep/28.7.885 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -