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Longitudinal CSF and MRI biomarkers improve the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment.
Neurobiol Aging 2006; 27(3):394-401NA

Abstract

The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is limited because it is based on non-specific behavioral and neuroimaging findings. The lesions of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid beta (Abeta) deposits, tau pathology and cellular oxidative damage, affect the hippocampus in the earlier stages causing memory impairment. In a 2-year longitudinal study of MCI patients and normal controls, we examined the hypothesis that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers for these pathological features improve the diagnostic accuracy over memory and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hippocampal volume evaluations. Relative to control, MCI patients showed decreased memory and hippocampal volumes and elevated CSF levels of hyperphosphorylated tau and isoprostane. These two CSF measures consistently improved the diagnostic accuracy over the memory measures and the isoprostane measure incremented the accuracy of the hippocampal volume achieving overall diagnostic accuracies of about 90%. Among MCI patients, over 2 years, longitudinal hippocampal volume losses were closely associated with increasing hyperphosphorylated tau and decreasing amyloid beta-42 levels. These results demonstrate that CSF biomarkers for AD contribute to the characterization of MCI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine New York, Center for Brain Health of the Silberstein Institute, NY 10016, USA. mony.deleon@med.nyu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16125823

Citation

de Leon, M J., et al. "Longitudinal CSF and MRI Biomarkers Improve the Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 27, no. 3, 2006, pp. 394-401.
de Leon MJ, DeSanti S, Zinkowski R, et al. Longitudinal CSF and MRI biomarkers improve the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. Neurobiol Aging. 2006;27(3):394-401.
de Leon, M. J., DeSanti, S., Zinkowski, R., Mehta, P. D., Pratico, D., Segal, S., ... Davies, P. (2006). Longitudinal CSF and MRI biomarkers improve the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. Neurobiology of Aging, 27(3), pp. 394-401.
de Leon MJ, et al. Longitudinal CSF and MRI Biomarkers Improve the Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Neurobiol Aging. 2006;27(3):394-401. PubMed PMID: 16125823.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal CSF and MRI biomarkers improve the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. AU - de Leon,M J, AU - DeSanti,S, AU - Zinkowski,R, AU - Mehta,P D, AU - Pratico,D, AU - Segal,S, AU - Rusinek,H, AU - Li,J, AU - Tsui,W, AU - Saint Louis,L A, AU - Clark,C M, AU - Tarshish,C, AU - Li,Y, AU - Lair,L, AU - Javier,E, AU - Rich,K, AU - Lesbre,P, AU - Mosconi,L, AU - Reisberg,B, AU - Sadowski,M, AU - DeBernadis,J F, AU - Kerkman,D J, AU - Hampel,H, AU - Wahlund,L-O, AU - Davies,P, Y1 - 2005/08/26/ PY - 2005/01/03/received PY - 2005/05/28/revised PY - 2005/07/01/accepted PY - 2005/8/30/pubmed PY - 2006/4/14/medline PY - 2005/8/30/entrez SP - 394 EP - 401 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol. Aging VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is limited because it is based on non-specific behavioral and neuroimaging findings. The lesions of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid beta (Abeta) deposits, tau pathology and cellular oxidative damage, affect the hippocampus in the earlier stages causing memory impairment. In a 2-year longitudinal study of MCI patients and normal controls, we examined the hypothesis that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers for these pathological features improve the diagnostic accuracy over memory and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hippocampal volume evaluations. Relative to control, MCI patients showed decreased memory and hippocampal volumes and elevated CSF levels of hyperphosphorylated tau and isoprostane. These two CSF measures consistently improved the diagnostic accuracy over the memory measures and the isoprostane measure incremented the accuracy of the hippocampal volume achieving overall diagnostic accuracies of about 90%. Among MCI patients, over 2 years, longitudinal hippocampal volume losses were closely associated with increasing hyperphosphorylated tau and decreasing amyloid beta-42 levels. These results demonstrate that CSF biomarkers for AD contribute to the characterization of MCI. SN - 0197-4580 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16125823/Longitudinal_CSF_and_MRI_biomarkers_improve_the_diagnosis_of_mild_cognitive_impairment_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(05)00197-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -