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Dietary intakes of fat and fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: a prospective study in Japan.
Cancer Sci 2005; 96(9):590-9CS

Abstract

To examine the possible association of dietary fat and fatty acids with breast cancer risk in a population with a low total fat intake and a high consumption of fish, we analyzed data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study. From 1988 to 1990, 26 291 women aged 40-79 years completed a questionnaire on dietary and other factors. Intakes of fat or fatty acids were estimated by using a food frequency questionnaire. Rate ratios (RR) were computed by fitting proportional hazards models. During the mean follow-up of 7.6 years, 129 breast cancer cases were documented. We found no clear association of total fat intake with breast cancer risk; the multivariate-adjusted RR across quartiles were 1.00, 1.29, 0.95, and 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-1.38). A significant decrease in the risk was detected for the highest quartile of intake compared with the lowest for fish fat and long-chain n-3 fatty acids; the RR were 0.56 (95% CI 0.33-0.94) and 0.50 (0.30-0.85), respectively. A decreasing trend in risk was also suggested with an increasing intake of saturated fatty acids (trend P = 0.066). Among postmenopausal women at baseline, the highest quartile of vegetable fat intake was associated with a 2.08-fold increase in risk (95% CI 1.05-4.13). This prospective study did not support any increase in the risk of breast cancer associated with total or saturated fat intake, but it suggested the protective effects of the long-chain n-3 fatty acids that are abundant in fish.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1 Kanokoden, Nagoya 464-8681, Japan. wakai@aichi-cc.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16128744

Citation

Wakai, Kenji, et al. "Dietary Intakes of Fat and Fatty Acids and Risk of Breast Cancer: a Prospective Study in Japan." Cancer Science, vol. 96, no. 9, 2005, pp. 590-9.
Wakai K, Tamakoshi K, Date C, et al. Dietary intakes of fat and fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: a prospective study in Japan. Cancer Sci. 2005;96(9):590-9.
Wakai, K., Tamakoshi, K., Date, C., Fukui, M., Suzuki, S., Lin, Y., ... Tamakoshi, A. (2005). Dietary intakes of fat and fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: a prospective study in Japan. Cancer Science, 96(9), pp. 590-9.
Wakai K, et al. Dietary Intakes of Fat and Fatty Acids and Risk of Breast Cancer: a Prospective Study in Japan. Cancer Sci. 2005;96(9):590-9. PubMed PMID: 16128744.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intakes of fat and fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: a prospective study in Japan. AU - Wakai,Kenji, AU - Tamakoshi,Koji, AU - Date,Chigusa, AU - Fukui,Mitsuru, AU - Suzuki,Sadao, AU - Lin,Yingsong, AU - Niwa,Yoshimitsu, AU - Nishio,Kazuko, AU - Yatsuya,Hiroshi, AU - Kondo,Takaaki, AU - Tokudome,Shinkan, AU - Yamamoto,Akio, AU - Toyoshima,Hideaki, AU - Tamakoshi,Akiko, AU - ,, PY - 2005/9/1/pubmed PY - 2005/10/28/medline PY - 2005/9/1/entrez SP - 590 EP - 9 JF - Cancer science JO - Cancer Sci. VL - 96 IS - 9 N2 - To examine the possible association of dietary fat and fatty acids with breast cancer risk in a population with a low total fat intake and a high consumption of fish, we analyzed data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study. From 1988 to 1990, 26 291 women aged 40-79 years completed a questionnaire on dietary and other factors. Intakes of fat or fatty acids were estimated by using a food frequency questionnaire. Rate ratios (RR) were computed by fitting proportional hazards models. During the mean follow-up of 7.6 years, 129 breast cancer cases were documented. We found no clear association of total fat intake with breast cancer risk; the multivariate-adjusted RR across quartiles were 1.00, 1.29, 0.95, and 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-1.38). A significant decrease in the risk was detected for the highest quartile of intake compared with the lowest for fish fat and long-chain n-3 fatty acids; the RR were 0.56 (95% CI 0.33-0.94) and 0.50 (0.30-0.85), respectively. A decreasing trend in risk was also suggested with an increasing intake of saturated fatty acids (trend P = 0.066). Among postmenopausal women at baseline, the highest quartile of vegetable fat intake was associated with a 2.08-fold increase in risk (95% CI 1.05-4.13). This prospective study did not support any increase in the risk of breast cancer associated with total or saturated fat intake, but it suggested the protective effects of the long-chain n-3 fatty acids that are abundant in fish. SN - 1347-9032 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16128744/Dietary_intakes_of_fat_and_fatty_acids_and_risk_of_breast_cancer:_a_prospective_study_in_Japan_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.2005.00084.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -