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Meat, meat cooking methods and preservation, and risk for colorectal adenoma.
Cancer Res. 2005 Sep 01; 65(17):8034-41.CR

Abstract

Cooking meat at high temperatures produces heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Processed meats contain N-nitroso compounds. Meat intake may increase cancer risk as HCAs, PAHs, and N-nitroso compounds are carcinogenic in animal models. We investigated meat, processed meat, HCAs, and the PAH benzo(a)pyrene and the risk of colorectal adenoma in 3,696 left-sided (descending and sigmoid colon and rectum) adenoma cases and 34,817 endoscopy-negative controls. Dietary intake was assessed using a 137-item food frequency questionnaire, with additional questions on meats and meat cooking practices. The questionnaire was linked to a previously developed database to determine exposure to HCAs and PAHs. Intake of red meat, with known doneness/cooking methods, was associated with an increased risk of adenoma in the descending and sigmoid colon [odds ratio (OR), 1.26; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.05-1.50 comparing extreme quintiles of intake] but not rectal adenoma. Well-done red meat was associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06-1.37). Increased risks for adenoma of the descending colon and sigmoid colon were observed for the two HCAs: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5]pyridine (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.38 and OR, 1.17, 95% CI, 1.01-1.35, respectively) as well as benzo(a)pyrene (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.35). Greater intake of bacon and sausage was associated with increased colorectal adenoma risk (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.30); however, total intake of processed meat was not (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.90-1.19). Our study of screening-detected colorectal adenomas shows that red meat and meat cooked at high temperatures are associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. sinhar@nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16140978

Citation

Sinha, Rashmi, et al. "Meat, Meat Cooking Methods and Preservation, and Risk for Colorectal Adenoma." Cancer Research, vol. 65, no. 17, 2005, pp. 8034-41.
Sinha R, Peters U, Cross AJ, et al. Meat, meat cooking methods and preservation, and risk for colorectal adenoma. Cancer Res. 2005;65(17):8034-41.
Sinha, R., Peters, U., Cross, A. J., Kulldorff, M., Weissfeld, J. L., Pinsky, P. F., Rothman, N., & Hayes, R. B. (2005). Meat, meat cooking methods and preservation, and risk for colorectal adenoma. Cancer Research, 65(17), 8034-41.
Sinha R, et al. Meat, Meat Cooking Methods and Preservation, and Risk for Colorectal Adenoma. Cancer Res. 2005 Sep 1;65(17):8034-41. PubMed PMID: 16140978.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat, meat cooking methods and preservation, and risk for colorectal adenoma. AU - Sinha,Rashmi, AU - Peters,Ulrike, AU - Cross,Amanda J, AU - Kulldorff,Martin, AU - Weissfeld,Joel L, AU - Pinsky,Paul F, AU - Rothman,Nathaniel, AU - Hayes,Richard B, PY - 2005/9/6/pubmed PY - 2005/11/16/medline PY - 2005/9/6/entrez SP - 8034 EP - 41 JF - Cancer research JO - Cancer Res VL - 65 IS - 17 N2 - Cooking meat at high temperatures produces heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Processed meats contain N-nitroso compounds. Meat intake may increase cancer risk as HCAs, PAHs, and N-nitroso compounds are carcinogenic in animal models. We investigated meat, processed meat, HCAs, and the PAH benzo(a)pyrene and the risk of colorectal adenoma in 3,696 left-sided (descending and sigmoid colon and rectum) adenoma cases and 34,817 endoscopy-negative controls. Dietary intake was assessed using a 137-item food frequency questionnaire, with additional questions on meats and meat cooking practices. The questionnaire was linked to a previously developed database to determine exposure to HCAs and PAHs. Intake of red meat, with known doneness/cooking methods, was associated with an increased risk of adenoma in the descending and sigmoid colon [odds ratio (OR), 1.26; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.05-1.50 comparing extreme quintiles of intake] but not rectal adenoma. Well-done red meat was associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06-1.37). Increased risks for adenoma of the descending colon and sigmoid colon were observed for the two HCAs: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5]pyridine (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.38 and OR, 1.17, 95% CI, 1.01-1.35, respectively) as well as benzo(a)pyrene (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.35). Greater intake of bacon and sausage was associated with increased colorectal adenoma risk (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.30); however, total intake of processed meat was not (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.90-1.19). Our study of screening-detected colorectal adenomas shows that red meat and meat cooked at high temperatures are associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenoma. SN - 0008-5472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16140978/Meat_meat_cooking_methods_and_preservation_and_risk_for_colorectal_adenoma_ L2 - http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16140978 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -