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Natural variation in toxicity of wheat: potential for selection of nontoxic varieties for celiac disease patients.
Gastroenterology. 2005 Sep; 129(3):797-806.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Celiac disease (CD) is an intestinal disorder caused by T-cell responses to peptides derived from the gluten proteins present in wheat. Such peptides have been found both in the gliadin and glutenin proteins in gluten. The only cure for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet. It is unknown, however, if all wheat varieties are equally harmful for patients. We investigated whether wheat varieties exist with a natural low number of T-cell-stimulatory epitopes.

METHODS

Gluten proteins present in public databases were analyzed for the presence of T-cell-stimulatory sequences. In addition, wheat accessions from diploid (AA, SS/BB, and DD genomes), tetraploid (AABB), and hexaploid (AABBDD) Triticum species were tested for the presence of T-cell-stimulatory epitopes in gliadins and glutenins by both T-cell and monoclonal antibody-based assays.

RESULTS

The database analysis readily identified gluten proteins that lack 1 or more of the known T-cell-stimulatory sequences. Moreover, both the T-cell- and antibody-based assays showed that a large variation exists in the amount of T-cell-stimulatory peptides present in the wheat accessions.

CONCLUSIONS

Sufficient genetic variation is present to endeavor the selection of wheat accessions that contain low amounts of T-cell-stimulatory sequences. Such materials may be used to select and breed wheat varieties suitable for consumption by CD patients, contributing to a well-balanced diet and an increase in their quality of life. Such varieties also may be useful for disease prevention in individuals at risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. e.h.a.spaenij-dekking@lumc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16143119

Citation

Spaenij-Dekking, Liesbeth, et al. "Natural Variation in Toxicity of Wheat: Potential for Selection of Nontoxic Varieties for Celiac Disease Patients." Gastroenterology, vol. 129, no. 3, 2005, pp. 797-806.
Spaenij-Dekking L, Kooy-Winkelaar Y, van Veelen P, et al. Natural variation in toxicity of wheat: potential for selection of nontoxic varieties for celiac disease patients. Gastroenterology. 2005;129(3):797-806.
Spaenij-Dekking, L., Kooy-Winkelaar, Y., van Veelen, P., Drijfhout, J. W., Jonker, H., van Soest, L., Smulders, M. J., Bosch, D., Gilissen, L. J., & Koning, F. (2005). Natural variation in toxicity of wheat: potential for selection of nontoxic varieties for celiac disease patients. Gastroenterology, 129(3), 797-806.
Spaenij-Dekking L, et al. Natural Variation in Toxicity of Wheat: Potential for Selection of Nontoxic Varieties for Celiac Disease Patients. Gastroenterology. 2005;129(3):797-806. PubMed PMID: 16143119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Natural variation in toxicity of wheat: potential for selection of nontoxic varieties for celiac disease patients. AU - Spaenij-Dekking,Liesbeth, AU - Kooy-Winkelaar,Yvonne, AU - van Veelen,Peter, AU - Drijfhout,Jan Wouter, AU - Jonker,Harry, AU - van Soest,Loek, AU - Smulders,Marinus J M, AU - Bosch,Dirk, AU - Gilissen,Luud J W J, AU - Koning,Frits, PY - 2004/10/07/received PY - 2005/05/26/accepted PY - 2005/9/7/pubmed PY - 2005/10/27/medline PY - 2005/9/7/entrez SP - 797 EP - 806 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 129 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease (CD) is an intestinal disorder caused by T-cell responses to peptides derived from the gluten proteins present in wheat. Such peptides have been found both in the gliadin and glutenin proteins in gluten. The only cure for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet. It is unknown, however, if all wheat varieties are equally harmful for patients. We investigated whether wheat varieties exist with a natural low number of T-cell-stimulatory epitopes. METHODS: Gluten proteins present in public databases were analyzed for the presence of T-cell-stimulatory sequences. In addition, wheat accessions from diploid (AA, SS/BB, and DD genomes), tetraploid (AABB), and hexaploid (AABBDD) Triticum species were tested for the presence of T-cell-stimulatory epitopes in gliadins and glutenins by both T-cell and monoclonal antibody-based assays. RESULTS: The database analysis readily identified gluten proteins that lack 1 or more of the known T-cell-stimulatory sequences. Moreover, both the T-cell- and antibody-based assays showed that a large variation exists in the amount of T-cell-stimulatory peptides present in the wheat accessions. CONCLUSIONS: Sufficient genetic variation is present to endeavor the selection of wheat accessions that contain low amounts of T-cell-stimulatory sequences. Such materials may be used to select and breed wheat varieties suitable for consumption by CD patients, contributing to a well-balanced diet and an increase in their quality of life. Such varieties also may be useful for disease prevention in individuals at risk. SN - 0016-5085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16143119/Natural_variation_in_toxicity_of_wheat:_potential_for_selection_of_nontoxic_varieties_for_celiac_disease_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(05)01119-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -