Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Pneumococcal acute otitis media in relation to pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Sep; 24(9):801-6.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Acute otitis media (AOM) is closely associated with viral upper respiratory tract infections, but the most common microbial agent found in the middle ear fluid during AOM is Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pnc). Pnc is also a common colonizer of the nasopharynx, and its prevalence is further increased during the viral infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the interplay between viral infection, pneumococcal acquisition and carriage in the development of Pnc AOM.

METHODS

Pnc carriage was assessed in a longitudinal study of 329 infants at scheduled visits at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months of age (N = 1715). The clinical outcome of the first episode of respiratory infection ("sick visit," N = 774) in the following 3-month period was recorded. The occurrence and timing of Pnc AOM in relation to serotype specific carriage at the start of the observation period were assessed.

RESULTS

The occurrence, timing and duration of symptoms of the sick visits or the frequency of overall AOM were not associated with preceding pneumococcal carriage. Pnc AOM was in each case associated with concurrent carriage and 3.8 times (95% confidence interval, 1.4-10.0) more often with carriage acquired after the start of the observation period than with carriage already present at the scheduled visit. In all, 79% (55 of 70) of Pnc AOM events were caused by a serotype acquired after the start of the period.

CONCLUSION

The majority of Pnc AOM events develop in association with newly acquired carriage of pneumococcus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Vaccines, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. ritva.syrjanen@ktl.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16148847

Citation

Syrjänen, Ritva K., et al. "Pneumococcal Acute Otitis Media in Relation to Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 24, no. 9, 2005, pp. 801-6.
Syrjänen RK, Auranen KJ, Leino TM, et al. Pneumococcal acute otitis media in relation to pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005;24(9):801-6.
Syrjänen, R. K., Auranen, K. J., Leino, T. M., Kilpi, T. M., & Mäkelä, P. H. (2005). Pneumococcal acute otitis media in relation to pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 24(9), 801-6.
Syrjänen RK, et al. Pneumococcal Acute Otitis Media in Relation to Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005;24(9):801-6. PubMed PMID: 16148847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pneumococcal acute otitis media in relation to pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage. AU - Syrjänen,Ritva K, AU - Auranen,Kari J, AU - Leino,Tuija M, AU - Kilpi,Terhi M, AU - Mäkelä,P Helena, PY - 2005/9/9/pubmed PY - 2006/1/7/medline PY - 2005/9/9/entrez SP - 801 EP - 6 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 24 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Acute otitis media (AOM) is closely associated with viral upper respiratory tract infections, but the most common microbial agent found in the middle ear fluid during AOM is Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pnc). Pnc is also a common colonizer of the nasopharynx, and its prevalence is further increased during the viral infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the interplay between viral infection, pneumococcal acquisition and carriage in the development of Pnc AOM. METHODS: Pnc carriage was assessed in a longitudinal study of 329 infants at scheduled visits at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months of age (N = 1715). The clinical outcome of the first episode of respiratory infection ("sick visit," N = 774) in the following 3-month period was recorded. The occurrence and timing of Pnc AOM in relation to serotype specific carriage at the start of the observation period were assessed. RESULTS: The occurrence, timing and duration of symptoms of the sick visits or the frequency of overall AOM were not associated with preceding pneumococcal carriage. Pnc AOM was in each case associated with concurrent carriage and 3.8 times (95% confidence interval, 1.4-10.0) more often with carriage acquired after the start of the observation period than with carriage already present at the scheduled visit. In all, 79% (55 of 70) of Pnc AOM events were caused by a serotype acquired after the start of the period. CONCLUSION: The majority of Pnc AOM events develop in association with newly acquired carriage of pneumococcus. SN - 0891-3668 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16148847/Pneumococcal_acute_otitis_media_in_relation_to_pneumococcal_nasopharyngeal_carriage_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.inf.0000178072.83531.4f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -