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Influenza vaccination trends among adults 65 years or older in the United States, 1989-2002.
Arch Intern Med. 2005 Sep 12; 165(16):1849-56.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Influenza vaccination of elderly individuals (65 years or older) has been recommended in the United States since 1961, and consistent surveillance of vaccine use has been conducted since 1989. We examined national trends in influenza vaccination coverage in the United States from 1989 to 2002 among noninstitutionalized elderly individuals and identified factors associated with receipt of influenza vaccine.

METHODS

We analyzed data from the 1989-2002 National Health Interview Surveys, weighted to reflect the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population to determine self-reported levels of influenza vaccination. We conducted multivariable logistic regression modeling of 2002 data to identify factors independently associated with self-reported influenza vaccination.

RESULTS

Among the elderly, influenza vaccination coverage increased from 30.5% in 1989 to 65.6% in 2002, with only a 2.4% increase from 1997 to 2002. In 2002, coverage remained lower for the non-Hispanic black (49.6%) and Hispanic (48.5%) populations compared with non-Hispanic whites (68.6%). Characteristics associated with a lower likelihood of influenza vaccination included fewer than 4 physician contacts in the past year and whether a person (1) was divorced or separated, (2) was non-Hispanic black or Hispanic, (3) had no regular physician, and (4) had less than a high school education. Individuals with chronic medical conditions and those 75 years or older were more likely to be vaccinated.

CONCLUSIONS

By 1997, influenza vaccination coverage exceeded the Healthy People 2000 objective of 60% for the elderly overall, but even by 2002, this objective was still not achieved in the elderly black and Hispanic populations. Vaccination coverage seems to be leveling off, and innovative initiatives are needed to reach the Healthy People 2010 target of 90%, especially among racial and ethnic minorities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology and Surveillance Division, National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga. 30333, USA. plu@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16157828

Citation

Lu, Peng-Jun, et al. "Influenza Vaccination Trends Among Adults 65 Years or Older in the United States, 1989-2002." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 165, no. 16, 2005, pp. 1849-56.
Lu PJ, Singleton JA, Rangel MC, et al. Influenza vaccination trends among adults 65 years or older in the United States, 1989-2002. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(16):1849-56.
Lu, P. J., Singleton, J. A., Rangel, M. C., Wortley, P. M., & Bridges, C. B. (2005). Influenza vaccination trends among adults 65 years or older in the United States, 1989-2002. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(16), 1849-56.
Lu PJ, et al. Influenza Vaccination Trends Among Adults 65 Years or Older in the United States, 1989-2002. Arch Intern Med. 2005 Sep 12;165(16):1849-56. PubMed PMID: 16157828.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influenza vaccination trends among adults 65 years or older in the United States, 1989-2002. AU - Lu,Peng-Jun, AU - Singleton,James A, AU - Rangel,María C, AU - Wortley,Pascale M, AU - Bridges,Carolyn Buxton, PY - 2005/9/15/pubmed PY - 2005/10/14/medline PY - 2005/9/15/entrez SP - 1849 EP - 56 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 165 IS - 16 N2 - BACKGROUND: Influenza vaccination of elderly individuals (65 years or older) has been recommended in the United States since 1961, and consistent surveillance of vaccine use has been conducted since 1989. We examined national trends in influenza vaccination coverage in the United States from 1989 to 2002 among noninstitutionalized elderly individuals and identified factors associated with receipt of influenza vaccine. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 1989-2002 National Health Interview Surveys, weighted to reflect the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population to determine self-reported levels of influenza vaccination. We conducted multivariable logistic regression modeling of 2002 data to identify factors independently associated with self-reported influenza vaccination. RESULTS: Among the elderly, influenza vaccination coverage increased from 30.5% in 1989 to 65.6% in 2002, with only a 2.4% increase from 1997 to 2002. In 2002, coverage remained lower for the non-Hispanic black (49.6%) and Hispanic (48.5%) populations compared with non-Hispanic whites (68.6%). Characteristics associated with a lower likelihood of influenza vaccination included fewer than 4 physician contacts in the past year and whether a person (1) was divorced or separated, (2) was non-Hispanic black or Hispanic, (3) had no regular physician, and (4) had less than a high school education. Individuals with chronic medical conditions and those 75 years or older were more likely to be vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: By 1997, influenza vaccination coverage exceeded the Healthy People 2000 objective of 60% for the elderly overall, but even by 2002, this objective was still not achieved in the elderly black and Hispanic populations. Vaccination coverage seems to be leveling off, and innovative initiatives are needed to reach the Healthy People 2010 target of 90%, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16157828/Influenza_vaccination_trends_among_adults_65_years_or_older_in_the_United_States_1989_2002_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.165.16.1849 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -