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Differences in perception of dysentery and enteric fever and willingness to receive vaccines among rural residents in China.
Vaccine. 2006 Jan 30; 24(5):561-71.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Enteric diseases including dysentery and enteric fever remain significant public health problems in China. While vaccines offer great potential in controlling these diseases, greater understanding of factors influencing acceptance of vaccines is needed to create effective enteric disease control programs in rural China.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional quantitative study with randomly sampled households from two sites in China, one experiencing high rates of shigellosis (Zengding) and the other of typhoid/paratyphoid (Lingchuan).

METHODS

Sociobehavioral survey data were collected through face-to-face interviews from 501 respondents (56% female) in Zhengding regarding dysentery and 624 in Lingchuan (51% female) regarding enteric fever. Vaccine acceptability was measured by expressed need for vaccination and willingness to pay. Comparative and associative analyses were conducted to assess disease perception, vaccination service satisfaction, likelihood of improvements in water and sanitation, and vaccine acceptability.

RESULTS

Nearly all respondents in Lingchuan considered enteric fever to be prevalent in the community, while only one half of the respondents in Zhengding considered dysentery to be problematic (p < 0.01). Nevertheless, more respondents in Zhengding were fearful that a household member would acquire dysentery than were Lingchuan respondents worried that a household member would acquire enteric fever (p < 0.01). Perceived vulnerability of specific subgroups (odds ratios ranging from 1.6 to 8.1), knowing someone who died of the disease (odds ratio reached infinity) and satisfaction with past vaccination services (odds ratios reached infinity) were consistently associated with perceived need for vaccines of target populations of all age groups while the association between perception of sanitary improvement and vaccine need was limited. Perceived need for a vaccine was associated with willingness to pay for the vaccine.

CONCLUSIONS

Perceptions of enhanced vulnerability of specific subgroups to a disease and satisfactory experiences with vaccination services may increase the perceived need for a vaccine, leading to increased willingness to pay for vaccine. Vaccines are not perceived as important for the elderly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Prevention Research Center, The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4201 St. Antoine Street UHC-6D, Detroit, MI 48201, USA. jimchen@med.wayne.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16159688

Citation

Chen, Xinguang, et al. "Differences in Perception of Dysentery and Enteric Fever and Willingness to Receive Vaccines Among Rural Residents in China." Vaccine, vol. 24, no. 5, 2006, pp. 561-71.
Chen X, Stanton B, Wang X, et al. Differences in perception of dysentery and enteric fever and willingness to receive vaccines among rural residents in China. Vaccine. 2006;24(5):561-71.
Chen, X., Stanton, B., Wang, X., Nyamette, A., Pach, A., Kaljee, L., Pack, R., von Seidlein, L., Clemens, J., Gong, Y., & Mao, R. (2006). Differences in perception of dysentery and enteric fever and willingness to receive vaccines among rural residents in China. Vaccine, 24(5), 561-71.
Chen X, et al. Differences in Perception of Dysentery and Enteric Fever and Willingness to Receive Vaccines Among Rural Residents in China. Vaccine. 2006 Jan 30;24(5):561-71. PubMed PMID: 16159688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in perception of dysentery and enteric fever and willingness to receive vaccines among rural residents in China. AU - Chen,Xinguang, AU - Stanton,Bonita, AU - Wang,Xuanyi, AU - Nyamette,Andrew, AU - Pach,Alfred, AU - Kaljee,Linda, AU - Pack,Robert, AU - von Seidlein,Lorenz, AU - Clemens,John, AU - Gong,Youlong, AU - Mao,Rong, Y1 - 2005/08/30/ PY - 2005/06/23/received PY - 2005/08/16/accepted PY - 2005/9/15/pubmed PY - 2006/4/21/medline PY - 2005/9/15/entrez SP - 561 EP - 71 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Enteric diseases including dysentery and enteric fever remain significant public health problems in China. While vaccines offer great potential in controlling these diseases, greater understanding of factors influencing acceptance of vaccines is needed to create effective enteric disease control programs in rural China. DESIGN: Cross-sectional quantitative study with randomly sampled households from two sites in China, one experiencing high rates of shigellosis (Zengding) and the other of typhoid/paratyphoid (Lingchuan). METHODS: Sociobehavioral survey data were collected through face-to-face interviews from 501 respondents (56% female) in Zhengding regarding dysentery and 624 in Lingchuan (51% female) regarding enteric fever. Vaccine acceptability was measured by expressed need for vaccination and willingness to pay. Comparative and associative analyses were conducted to assess disease perception, vaccination service satisfaction, likelihood of improvements in water and sanitation, and vaccine acceptability. RESULTS: Nearly all respondents in Lingchuan considered enteric fever to be prevalent in the community, while only one half of the respondents in Zhengding considered dysentery to be problematic (p < 0.01). Nevertheless, more respondents in Zhengding were fearful that a household member would acquire dysentery than were Lingchuan respondents worried that a household member would acquire enteric fever (p < 0.01). Perceived vulnerability of specific subgroups (odds ratios ranging from 1.6 to 8.1), knowing someone who died of the disease (odds ratio reached infinity) and satisfaction with past vaccination services (odds ratios reached infinity) were consistently associated with perceived need for vaccines of target populations of all age groups while the association between perception of sanitary improvement and vaccine need was limited. Perceived need for a vaccine was associated with willingness to pay for the vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: Perceptions of enhanced vulnerability of specific subgroups to a disease and satisfactory experiences with vaccination services may increase the perceived need for a vaccine, leading to increased willingness to pay for vaccine. Vaccines are not perceived as important for the elderly. SN - 0264-410X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16159688/Differences_in_perception_of_dysentery_and_enteric_fever_and_willingness_to_receive_vaccines_among_rural_residents_in_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(05)00877-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -