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Factors predictive of increased influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in long-term care facilities: the CMS-CDC standing orders program Project.
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2005 Sep-Oct; 6(5):291-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Between 1999 and 2002, a multistate demonstration project was conducted in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) to encourage implementation of standing orders programs (SOP) as evidence-based vaccine delivery strategies to increase influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in LTCFs.

OBJECTIVE

Examine predictors of increase in influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in LTCFs.

DESIGN

Intervention study. Self-administered surveys of LTCFs merged with data from OSCAR (On-line Survey Certification and Reporting System) and immunization coverage was abstracted from residents' medical charts in LTCFs.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

Twenty LTCFs were sampled from 9 intervention and 5 control states in the 2000 to 2001 influenza season for baseline and during the 2001 to 2002 influenza season for postintervention.

INTERVENTION

Each state's quality improvement organization (QIO) promoted the use of standing orders for immunizations as well as other strategies to increase immunization coverage among LTCF residents.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Multivariate analysis included Poisson regression to determine independent predictors of at least a 10 percentage-point increase in facility influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage.

RESULTS

Forty-two (20%) and 59 (28%) of the facilities had at least a 10 percentage-point increase in influenza and pneumococcal immunizations, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, predictors associated with increase in influenza vaccination coverage included adoption of requirement in written immunization protocol to document refusals, less-demanding consent requirements, lower baseline influenza coverage, and small facility size. Factors associated with increase in pneumococcal vaccination coverage included adoption of recording pneumococcal immunizations in a consistent place, affiliation with a multifacility chain, and provision of resource materials.

CONCLUSIONS

To improve the health of LTCF residents, strategies should be considered that increase immunization coverage, including written protocol for immunizations and documentation of refusals, documenting vaccination status in a consistent place in medical records, and minimal consent requirements for vaccinations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Immunization Services Division, National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. bfb7@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16165069

Citation

Bardenheier, Barbara H., et al. "Factors Predictive of Increased Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Coverage in Long-term Care Facilities: the CMS-CDC Standing Orders Program Project." Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, vol. 6, no. 5, 2005, pp. 291-9.
Bardenheier BH, Shefer A, McKibben L, et al. Factors predictive of increased influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in long-term care facilities: the CMS-CDC standing orders program Project. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2005;6(5):291-9.
Bardenheier, B. H., Shefer, A., McKibben, L., Roberts, H., Rhew, D., & Bratzler, D. (2005). Factors predictive of increased influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in long-term care facilities: the CMS-CDC standing orders program Project. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 6(5), 291-9.
Bardenheier BH, et al. Factors Predictive of Increased Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Coverage in Long-term Care Facilities: the CMS-CDC Standing Orders Program Project. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2005 Sep-Oct;6(5):291-9. PubMed PMID: 16165069.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors predictive of increased influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in long-term care facilities: the CMS-CDC standing orders program Project. AU - Bardenheier,Barbara H, AU - Shefer,Abigail, AU - McKibben,Linda, AU - Roberts,Henry, AU - Rhew,David, AU - Bratzler,Dale, PY - 2005/9/17/pubmed PY - 2007/8/24/medline PY - 2005/9/17/entrez SP - 291 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association JO - J Am Med Dir Assoc VL - 6 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Between 1999 and 2002, a multistate demonstration project was conducted in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) to encourage implementation of standing orders programs (SOP) as evidence-based vaccine delivery strategies to increase influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in LTCFs. OBJECTIVE: Examine predictors of increase in influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage in LTCFs. DESIGN: Intervention study. Self-administered surveys of LTCFs merged with data from OSCAR (On-line Survey Certification and Reporting System) and immunization coverage was abstracted from residents' medical charts in LTCFs. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Twenty LTCFs were sampled from 9 intervention and 5 control states in the 2000 to 2001 influenza season for baseline and during the 2001 to 2002 influenza season for postintervention. INTERVENTION: Each state's quality improvement organization (QIO) promoted the use of standing orders for immunizations as well as other strategies to increase immunization coverage among LTCF residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Multivariate analysis included Poisson regression to determine independent predictors of at least a 10 percentage-point increase in facility influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage. RESULTS: Forty-two (20%) and 59 (28%) of the facilities had at least a 10 percentage-point increase in influenza and pneumococcal immunizations, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, predictors associated with increase in influenza vaccination coverage included adoption of requirement in written immunization protocol to document refusals, less-demanding consent requirements, lower baseline influenza coverage, and small facility size. Factors associated with increase in pneumococcal vaccination coverage included adoption of recording pneumococcal immunizations in a consistent place, affiliation with a multifacility chain, and provision of resource materials. CONCLUSIONS: To improve the health of LTCF residents, strategies should be considered that increase immunization coverage, including written protocol for immunizations and documentation of refusals, documenting vaccination status in a consistent place in medical records, and minimal consent requirements for vaccinations. SN - 1538-9375 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16165069/Factors_predictive_of_increased_influenza_and_pneumococcal_vaccination_coverage_in_long_term_care_facilities:_the_CMS_CDC_standing_orders_program_Project_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1525-8610(05)00436-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -