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Prospective comparison of short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor exercise/biofeedback training in patients with fecal incontinence after surgery plus irradiation versus surgery alone for colorectal cancer: clinical, functional and endoscopic/endosonographic findings.
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005 Oct; 40(10):1168-75.SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The influence of irradiation on the clinical severity of incontinence, sphincter function, morphologic features and short/long-term treatment effects of sphincter training therapy is still insufficiently understood in irradiated patients with fecal incontinence after surgery for colorectal cancer. These parameters were compared in irradiated and non-irradiated patients and followed prospectively with regard to short- and long-term training effects.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Forty-one patients having been irradiated after surgery (50.0+/-5.0 Gy) and 54 non-irradiated patients with fecal incontinence participated in this prospective, non-randomized trial. Baseline evaluation included a semiquantitative severity assessment score of fecal incontinence (modified Cleveland Incontinence Score (MCIS)), rectal manometry and endoscopy. After 3 weeks (short term) of intensive in-hospital pelvic floor exercise combined with biofeedback training, a second evaluation was made. In addition, anal endosonography (EUS) was performed in cases of treatment failure. After one year (long term) a third evaluation was made clinically (MCIS score).

RESULTS

Irradiated patients presented with a significantly higher degree of fecal incontinence (lower MCIS) compared to non-irradiated patients: 7.4+/-2.2 versus 8.7+/-2.7 points (p<0.001). Rectosigmoidal inflammation was more frequent in irradiated than non-irradiated patients (26.9% versus 9.3%) (p<0.03). Sphincter pressure, sensation/pain threshold and the rectoanal inhibitory reflex were similar in both groups. A significant short-term training effect was observed in both groups following sphincter training therapy in terms of an increase in MCIS from 7.4+/-2.2 to 9.4+/-2.7 points in the irradiated group and from 8.7+/-2.7 to 11.4+/-2.5 points in the non-irradiated group (p<0.0001). After one year the scores were 8.2+/-3.8 and 10.7+/-4.4 points, respectively (p<0.0001). There was a significant correlation (p<0.001) between baseline MCIS and the short- and long-term MCIS. In patients with short-term treatment failure (16.6%) anal EUS revealed structural defects of the external sphincter in four patients. There was no association of sphincter diameter with sphincter pressure, sensation/pain threshold and short/long-term MCIS.

CONCLUSIONS

The main result of this study is that irradiated patients show short- and long-term training effects comparable with those of non-irradiated patients despite the higher degree of incontinence at baseline. The correlation between the initial MCIS and short- and long-term treatment effects may be regarded as an important clinical predictor for treatment outcome. Functional and morphologic features are less suitable for this purpose.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department Oncology, Rehaklinik Ob der Tauber der LVA Baden-Württemberg, Bad Mergentheim, Academic Teaching Hospital, University of Heidelberg, Bad Mergentheim, Germany. allgayer@reha-klinik-odt.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16165701

Citation

Allgayer, Hubert, et al. "Prospective Comparison of Short- and Long-term Effects of Pelvic Floor Exercise/biofeedback Training in Patients With Fecal Incontinence After Surgery Plus Irradiation Versus Surgery Alone for Colorectal Cancer: Clinical, Functional and Endoscopic/endosonographic Findings." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 40, no. 10, 2005, pp. 1168-75.
Allgayer H, Dietrich CF, Rohde W, et al. Prospective comparison of short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor exercise/biofeedback training in patients with fecal incontinence after surgery plus irradiation versus surgery alone for colorectal cancer: clinical, functional and endoscopic/endosonographic findings. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005;40(10):1168-75.
Allgayer, H., Dietrich, C. F., Rohde, W., Koch, G. F., & Tuschhoff, T. (2005). Prospective comparison of short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor exercise/biofeedback training in patients with fecal incontinence after surgery plus irradiation versus surgery alone for colorectal cancer: clinical, functional and endoscopic/endosonographic findings. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 40(10), 1168-75.
Allgayer H, et al. Prospective Comparison of Short- and Long-term Effects of Pelvic Floor Exercise/biofeedback Training in Patients With Fecal Incontinence After Surgery Plus Irradiation Versus Surgery Alone for Colorectal Cancer: Clinical, Functional and Endoscopic/endosonographic Findings. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005;40(10):1168-75. PubMed PMID: 16165701.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective comparison of short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor exercise/biofeedback training in patients with fecal incontinence after surgery plus irradiation versus surgery alone for colorectal cancer: clinical, functional and endoscopic/endosonographic findings. AU - Allgayer,Hubert, AU - Dietrich,Christoph F, AU - Rohde,Wolfgang, AU - Koch,Günther F, AU - Tuschhoff,Thomas, PY - 2005/9/17/pubmed PY - 2006/5/26/medline PY - 2005/9/17/entrez SP - 1168 EP - 75 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand J Gastroenterol VL - 40 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The influence of irradiation on the clinical severity of incontinence, sphincter function, morphologic features and short/long-term treatment effects of sphincter training therapy is still insufficiently understood in irradiated patients with fecal incontinence after surgery for colorectal cancer. These parameters were compared in irradiated and non-irradiated patients and followed prospectively with regard to short- and long-term training effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-one patients having been irradiated after surgery (50.0+/-5.0 Gy) and 54 non-irradiated patients with fecal incontinence participated in this prospective, non-randomized trial. Baseline evaluation included a semiquantitative severity assessment score of fecal incontinence (modified Cleveland Incontinence Score (MCIS)), rectal manometry and endoscopy. After 3 weeks (short term) of intensive in-hospital pelvic floor exercise combined with biofeedback training, a second evaluation was made. In addition, anal endosonography (EUS) was performed in cases of treatment failure. After one year (long term) a third evaluation was made clinically (MCIS score). RESULTS: Irradiated patients presented with a significantly higher degree of fecal incontinence (lower MCIS) compared to non-irradiated patients: 7.4+/-2.2 versus 8.7+/-2.7 points (p<0.001). Rectosigmoidal inflammation was more frequent in irradiated than non-irradiated patients (26.9% versus 9.3%) (p<0.03). Sphincter pressure, sensation/pain threshold and the rectoanal inhibitory reflex were similar in both groups. A significant short-term training effect was observed in both groups following sphincter training therapy in terms of an increase in MCIS from 7.4+/-2.2 to 9.4+/-2.7 points in the irradiated group and from 8.7+/-2.7 to 11.4+/-2.5 points in the non-irradiated group (p<0.0001). After one year the scores were 8.2+/-3.8 and 10.7+/-4.4 points, respectively (p<0.0001). There was a significant correlation (p<0.001) between baseline MCIS and the short- and long-term MCIS. In patients with short-term treatment failure (16.6%) anal EUS revealed structural defects of the external sphincter in four patients. There was no association of sphincter diameter with sphincter pressure, sensation/pain threshold and short/long-term MCIS. CONCLUSIONS: The main result of this study is that irradiated patients show short- and long-term training effects comparable with those of non-irradiated patients despite the higher degree of incontinence at baseline. The correlation between the initial MCIS and short- and long-term treatment effects may be regarded as an important clinical predictor for treatment outcome. Functional and morphologic features are less suitable for this purpose. SN - 0036-5521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16165701/Prospective_comparison_of_short__and_long_term_effects_of_pelvic_floor_exercise/biofeedback_training_in_patients_with_fecal_incontinence_after_surgery_plus_irradiation_versus_surgery_alone_for_colorectal_cancer:_clinical_functional_and_endoscopic/endosonographic_findings_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365520510023477 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -