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Fruits and vegetables and ovarian cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies.

Abstract

Because fruits and vegetables are rich in bioactive compounds with potential cancer-preventive actions, increased consumption may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. Evidence on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and ovarian cancer risk has not been consistent. We analyzed and pooled the primary data from 12 prospective studies in North America and Europe. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured at baseline in each study using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. To summarize the association between fruit and vegetable intake and ovarian cancer, study-specific relative risks (RR) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model, and then combined using a random-effects model. Among 560,441 women, 2,130 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer occurred during a maximum follow-up of 7 to 22 years across studies. Total fruit intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk-the pooled multivariate RR for the highest versus the lowest quartile of intake was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.92-1.21; P value, test for trend = 0.73; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.74]. Similarly, results for total vegetable intake indicated no significant association (pooled multivariate RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.78-1.04, for the highest versus the lowest quartile; P value, test for trend = 0.06; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.31). Intakes of botanically defined fruit and vegetable groups and individual fruits and vegetables were also not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Associations for total fruits and vegetables were similar for different histologic types. These results suggest that fruit and vegetable consumption in adulthood has no important association with the risk of ovarian cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16172226

Citation

Koushik, Anita, et al. "Fruits and Vegetables and Ovarian Cancer Risk in a Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 14, no. 9, 2005, pp. 2160-7.
Koushik A, Hunter DJ, Spiegelman D, et al. Fruits and vegetables and ovarian cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005;14(9):2160-7.
Koushik, A., Hunter, D. J., Spiegelman, D., Anderson, K. E., Arslan, A. A., Beeson, W. L., ... Smith-Warner, S. A. (2005). Fruits and vegetables and ovarian cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 14(9), pp. 2160-7.
Koushik A, et al. Fruits and Vegetables and Ovarian Cancer Risk in a Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005;14(9):2160-7. PubMed PMID: 16172226.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruits and vegetables and ovarian cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies. AU - Koushik,Anita, AU - Hunter,David J, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Anderson,Kristin E, AU - Arslan,Alan A, AU - Beeson,W Lawrence, AU - van den Brandt,Piet A, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Cerhan,James R, AU - Colditz,Graham A, AU - Fraser,Gary E, AU - Freudenheim,Jo L, AU - Genkinger,Jeanine M, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Koenig,Karen L, AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Leitzmann,Michael, AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Miller,Anthony B, AU - Patel,Alpa, AU - Rohan,Thomas E, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Smit,Ellen, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Zhang,Shumin M, AU - Smith-Warner,Stephanie A, PY - 2005/9/21/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/9/21/entrez SP - 2160 EP - 7 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 14 IS - 9 N2 - Because fruits and vegetables are rich in bioactive compounds with potential cancer-preventive actions, increased consumption may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. Evidence on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and ovarian cancer risk has not been consistent. We analyzed and pooled the primary data from 12 prospective studies in North America and Europe. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured at baseline in each study using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. To summarize the association between fruit and vegetable intake and ovarian cancer, study-specific relative risks (RR) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model, and then combined using a random-effects model. Among 560,441 women, 2,130 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer occurred during a maximum follow-up of 7 to 22 years across studies. Total fruit intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk-the pooled multivariate RR for the highest versus the lowest quartile of intake was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.92-1.21; P value, test for trend = 0.73; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.74]. Similarly, results for total vegetable intake indicated no significant association (pooled multivariate RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.78-1.04, for the highest versus the lowest quartile; P value, test for trend = 0.06; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.31). Intakes of botanically defined fruit and vegetable groups and individual fruits and vegetables were also not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Associations for total fruits and vegetables were similar for different histologic types. These results suggest that fruit and vegetable consumption in adulthood has no important association with the risk of ovarian cancer. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16172226/Fruits_and_vegetables_and_ovarian_cancer_risk_in_a_pooled_analysis_of_12_cohort_studies_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16172226 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -