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Effects of music on target-controlled infusion of propofol requirements during combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia.
Anaesthesia. 2005 Oct; 60(10):990-4.A

Abstract

The sedative effects of music were evaluated using the bispectral index (BIS) during target-controlled infusion (TCI) propofol. A total of 110 women undergoing hysterectomy were randomly allocated to receive either music or no music. Propofol was administered using target-controlled infusion and the concentration adjusted gradually to achieve an observer's assessment of alertness/sedation (OAA/S) score of 3 intra-operatively. The haemodynamic and bispectral index values during the sedation phase were recorded. Interleukin-6 was evaluated before, immediately after and 1 h following intervention. The music group had a significant reduction in mean (SD) induction time of sedation: 12 (12) min vs. 18 (12) min, p < 0.01; propofol target concentration: 1.6 (0.3) microg.ml(-1) vs. 2.4 (0.4) microg.ml(-1), p < 0.0001; intra-operative amount of propofol: 171 (98) mg vs. 251 (92) mg, p < 0.0001; and significantly higher levels of satisfaction with their peri-operative care: 9.6 (0.6) compared to the control group: 8.1 (1.0), p < 0.0001. No other differences were found. The results show the influence of music on the induction time of sedation, concentration and level of propofol during surgery, and suggest sedative benefits of music.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anaesthesiology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. zlxu@mails.tjmu.edu.cnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16179044

Citation

Zhang, X W., et al. "Effects of Music On Target-controlled Infusion of Propofol Requirements During Combined Spinal-epidural Anaesthesia." Anaesthesia, vol. 60, no. 10, 2005, pp. 990-4.
Zhang XW, Fan Y, Manyande A, et al. Effects of music on target-controlled infusion of propofol requirements during combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia. Anaesthesia. 2005;60(10):990-4.
Zhang, X. W., Fan, Y., Manyande, A., Tian, Y. K., & Yin, P. (2005). Effects of music on target-controlled infusion of propofol requirements during combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia. Anaesthesia, 60(10), 990-4.
Zhang XW, et al. Effects of Music On Target-controlled Infusion of Propofol Requirements During Combined Spinal-epidural Anaesthesia. Anaesthesia. 2005;60(10):990-4. PubMed PMID: 16179044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of music on target-controlled infusion of propofol requirements during combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia. AU - Zhang,X W, AU - Fan,Y, AU - Manyande,A, AU - Tian,Y K, AU - Yin,P, PY - 2005/9/24/pubmed PY - 2005/10/18/medline PY - 2005/9/24/entrez SP - 990 EP - 4 JF - Anaesthesia JO - Anaesthesia VL - 60 IS - 10 N2 - The sedative effects of music were evaluated using the bispectral index (BIS) during target-controlled infusion (TCI) propofol. A total of 110 women undergoing hysterectomy were randomly allocated to receive either music or no music. Propofol was administered using target-controlled infusion and the concentration adjusted gradually to achieve an observer's assessment of alertness/sedation (OAA/S) score of 3 intra-operatively. The haemodynamic and bispectral index values during the sedation phase were recorded. Interleukin-6 was evaluated before, immediately after and 1 h following intervention. The music group had a significant reduction in mean (SD) induction time of sedation: 12 (12) min vs. 18 (12) min, p < 0.01; propofol target concentration: 1.6 (0.3) microg.ml(-1) vs. 2.4 (0.4) microg.ml(-1), p < 0.0001; intra-operative amount of propofol: 171 (98) mg vs. 251 (92) mg, p < 0.0001; and significantly higher levels of satisfaction with their peri-operative care: 9.6 (0.6) compared to the control group: 8.1 (1.0), p < 0.0001. No other differences were found. The results show the influence of music on the induction time of sedation, concentration and level of propofol during surgery, and suggest sedative benefits of music. SN - 0003-2409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16179044/Effects_of_music_on_target_controlled_infusion_of_propofol_requirements_during_combined_spinal_epidural_anaesthesia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2044.2005.04299.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -