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Oxazepam does not modulate the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine in humans.
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2005 Oct; 82(2):270-9.PB

Abstract

Benzodiazepines, which are gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA(A)) receptor positive modulators, can block the behavioral effects of psychomotor stimulants. In the present study, the ability of oxazepam, which may have less abuse potential compared to some other benzodiazepines, to attenuate the discriminative-stimulus, subject-rated and psychomotor performance effects of d-amphetamine in humans was determined. Six healthy participants (2 female, 4 male) learned to discriminate 15 mg oral d-amphetamine. After acquiring the discrimination (i.e., > or = 80% correct responding on 4 consecutive days), the effects of d-amphetamine (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg), alone and in combination with acutely administered oxazepam (0 and 20 mg) were assessed. d-Amphetamine alone functioned as a discriminative stimulus, produced stimulant-like subject-rated effects (e.g., increased ratings of Stimulated on a Drug-Effect Questionnaire) and enhanced psychomotor performance. Oxazepam alone increased subject ratings of sedation (e.g., increased ratings of Sluggish, Fatigued and Lazy on a Drug-Effect Questionnaire) and impaired psychomotor performance. Oxazepam alone did not occasion d-amphetamine-like discriminative-stimulus effects, and had no effect on the discriminative-stimulus or subject-rated effects of d-amphetamine when given in combination. The results of this experiment are discordant with previous research and suggest that benzodiazepines differ in their ability to modulate the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0086, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16182353

Citation

Lile, Joshua A., et al. "Oxazepam Does Not Modulate the Behavioral Effects of D-amphetamine in Humans." Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, vol. 82, no. 2, 2005, pp. 270-9.
Lile JA, Stoops WW, Wagner FP, et al. Oxazepam does not modulate the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine in humans. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2005;82(2):270-9.
Lile, J. A., Stoops, W. W., Wagner, F. P., Glaser, P. E., & Rush, C. R. (2005). Oxazepam does not modulate the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine in humans. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 82(2), 270-9.
Lile JA, et al. Oxazepam Does Not Modulate the Behavioral Effects of D-amphetamine in Humans. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2005;82(2):270-9. PubMed PMID: 16182353.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oxazepam does not modulate the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine in humans. AU - Lile,Joshua A, AU - Stoops,William W, AU - Wagner,Frances P, AU - Glaser,Paul E A, AU - Rush,Craig R, Y1 - 2005/09/22/ PY - 2005/02/11/received PY - 2005/08/10/revised PY - 2005/08/16/accepted PY - 2005/9/27/pubmed PY - 2006/3/3/medline PY - 2005/9/27/entrez SP - 270 EP - 9 JF - Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior JO - Pharmacol Biochem Behav VL - 82 IS - 2 N2 - Benzodiazepines, which are gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA(A)) receptor positive modulators, can block the behavioral effects of psychomotor stimulants. In the present study, the ability of oxazepam, which may have less abuse potential compared to some other benzodiazepines, to attenuate the discriminative-stimulus, subject-rated and psychomotor performance effects of d-amphetamine in humans was determined. Six healthy participants (2 female, 4 male) learned to discriminate 15 mg oral d-amphetamine. After acquiring the discrimination (i.e., > or = 80% correct responding on 4 consecutive days), the effects of d-amphetamine (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg), alone and in combination with acutely administered oxazepam (0 and 20 mg) were assessed. d-Amphetamine alone functioned as a discriminative stimulus, produced stimulant-like subject-rated effects (e.g., increased ratings of Stimulated on a Drug-Effect Questionnaire) and enhanced psychomotor performance. Oxazepam alone increased subject ratings of sedation (e.g., increased ratings of Sluggish, Fatigued and Lazy on a Drug-Effect Questionnaire) and impaired psychomotor performance. Oxazepam alone did not occasion d-amphetamine-like discriminative-stimulus effects, and had no effect on the discriminative-stimulus or subject-rated effects of d-amphetamine when given in combination. The results of this experiment are discordant with previous research and suggest that benzodiazepines differ in their ability to modulate the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine. SN - 0091-3057 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16182353/Oxazepam_does_not_modulate_the_behavioral_effects_of_d_amphetamine_in_humans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-3057(05)00290-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -