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Gamma-glutamyltransferase as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality: an epidemiological investigation in a cohort of 163,944 Austrian adults.
Circulation 2005; 112(14):2130-7Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is evidence from recent studies that gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is likely to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, few studies to date with sufficient sample size and follow-up investigated the association of GGT with CVD mortality.

METHODS AND RESULTS

The relation of GGT to the risk of death from CVD was examined in a cohort of 163,944 Austrian adults that was monitored for up to 17 years. To evaluate GGT as an independent predictor, Cox proportional hazards models were calculated, which adjusted for established risk factors. In both men and women, high GGT was significantly (P<0.001) associated with total mortality from CVD, showing a clear dose-response relationship. Adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) per log GGT increase were 1.66 (1.40 to 1.98) in men and 1.64 (1.36 to 1.97) in women. In men, subgroup analyses showed that high GGT was positively associated with incident fatal events of chronic forms of coronary heart disease (P=0.009), congestive heart failure (P<0.001), and hemorrhagic (P=0.01) and ischemic stroke (P<0.001). No significant associations were observed for acute myocardial infarction (P=0.16). In women, hazard ratios suggested associations in all subgroups; however, for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke they were not statistically significant (P=0.09 and P=0.07, respectively). In addition, subgroup analyses stratified by age revealed a stronger relationship of GGT in younger participants. Hazard ratios for total CVD were 2.03 (1.53 to 2.69) in men and 2.60 (1.53 to 4.42) in women younger than 60 years.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates in a large, prospectively observed cohort that GGT is independently associated with cardiovascular mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Health Economics, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16186419

Citation

Ruttmann, Elfriede, et al. "Gamma-glutamyltransferase as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: an Epidemiological Investigation in a Cohort of 163,944 Austrian Adults." Circulation, vol. 112, no. 14, 2005, pp. 2130-7.
Ruttmann E, Brant LJ, Concin H, et al. Gamma-glutamyltransferase as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality: an epidemiological investigation in a cohort of 163,944 Austrian adults. Circulation. 2005;112(14):2130-7.
Ruttmann, E., Brant, L. J., Concin, H., Diem, G., Rapp, K., & Ulmer, H. (2005). Gamma-glutamyltransferase as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality: an epidemiological investigation in a cohort of 163,944 Austrian adults. Circulation, 112(14), pp. 2130-7.
Ruttmann E, et al. Gamma-glutamyltransferase as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: an Epidemiological Investigation in a Cohort of 163,944 Austrian Adults. Circulation. 2005 Oct 4;112(14):2130-7. PubMed PMID: 16186419.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gamma-glutamyltransferase as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality: an epidemiological investigation in a cohort of 163,944 Austrian adults. AU - Ruttmann,Elfriede, AU - Brant,Larry J, AU - Concin,Hans, AU - Diem,Günter, AU - Rapp,Kilian, AU - Ulmer,Hanno, AU - ,, Y1 - 2005/09/26/ PY - 2005/9/28/pubmed PY - 2006/3/3/medline PY - 2005/9/28/entrez SP - 2130 EP - 7 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 112 IS - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is evidence from recent studies that gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is likely to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, few studies to date with sufficient sample size and follow-up investigated the association of GGT with CVD mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: The relation of GGT to the risk of death from CVD was examined in a cohort of 163,944 Austrian adults that was monitored for up to 17 years. To evaluate GGT as an independent predictor, Cox proportional hazards models were calculated, which adjusted for established risk factors. In both men and women, high GGT was significantly (P<0.001) associated with total mortality from CVD, showing a clear dose-response relationship. Adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) per log GGT increase were 1.66 (1.40 to 1.98) in men and 1.64 (1.36 to 1.97) in women. In men, subgroup analyses showed that high GGT was positively associated with incident fatal events of chronic forms of coronary heart disease (P=0.009), congestive heart failure (P<0.001), and hemorrhagic (P=0.01) and ischemic stroke (P<0.001). No significant associations were observed for acute myocardial infarction (P=0.16). In women, hazard ratios suggested associations in all subgroups; however, for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke they were not statistically significant (P=0.09 and P=0.07, respectively). In addition, subgroup analyses stratified by age revealed a stronger relationship of GGT in younger participants. Hazard ratios for total CVD were 2.03 (1.53 to 2.69) in men and 2.60 (1.53 to 4.42) in women younger than 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates in a large, prospectively observed cohort that GGT is independently associated with cardiovascular mortality. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16186419/Gamma_glutamyltransferase_as_a_risk_factor_for_cardiovascular_disease_mortality:_an_epidemiological_investigation_in_a_cohort_of_163944_Austrian_adults_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.552547?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -