Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.
Neurology 2005; 65(6):812-9Neur

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Central pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common and often refractory to treatment.

METHODS

We conducted a single-center, 5-week (1-week run-in, 4-week treatment), randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial in 66 patients with MS and central pain states (59 dysesthetic, seven painful spasms) of a whole-plant cannabis-based medicine (CBM), containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol:cannabidiol (THC:CBD) delivered via an oromucosal spray, as adjunctive analgesic treatment. Each spray delivered 2.7 mg of THC and 2.5 of CBD, and patients could gradually self-titrate to a maximum of 48 sprays in 24 hours.

RESULTS

Sixty-four patients (97%) completed the trial, 34 received CBM. In week 4, the mean number of daily sprays taken of CBM (n = 32) was 9.6 (range 2 to 25, SD = 6.0) and of placebo (n = 31) was 19.1 (range 1 to 47, SD = 12.9). Pain and sleep disturbance were recorded daily on an 11-point numerical rating scale. CBM was superior to placebo in reducing the mean intensity of pain (CBM mean change -2.7, 95% CI: -3.4 to -2.0, placebo -1.4 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.8, comparison between groups, p = 0.005) and sleep disturbance (CBM mean change -2.5, 95% CI: -3.4 to -1.7, placebo -0.8, 95% CI: -1.5 to -0.1, comparison between groups, p = 0.003). CBM was generally well tolerated, although more patients on CBM than placebo reported dizziness, dry mouth, and somnolence. Cognitive side effects were limited to long-term memory storage.

CONCLUSIONS

Cannabis-based medicine is effective in reducing pain and sleep disturbance in patients with multiple sclerosis related central neuropathic pain and is mostly well tolerated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. djrdjr@doctors.org.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16186518

Citation

Rog, David J., et al. "Randomized, Controlled Trial of Cannabis-based Medicine in Central Pain in Multiple Sclerosis." Neurology, vol. 65, no. 6, 2005, pp. 812-9.
Rog DJ, Nurmikko TJ, Friede T, et al. Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis. Neurology. 2005;65(6):812-9.
Rog, D. J., Nurmikko, T. J., Friede, T., & Young, C. A. (2005). Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis. Neurology, 65(6), pp. 812-9.
Rog DJ, et al. Randomized, Controlled Trial of Cannabis-based Medicine in Central Pain in Multiple Sclerosis. Neurology. 2005 Sep 27;65(6):812-9. PubMed PMID: 16186518.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis. AU - Rog,David J, AU - Nurmikko,Turo J, AU - Friede,Tim, AU - Young,Carolyn A, PY - 2005/9/28/pubmed PY - 2006/3/11/medline PY - 2005/9/28/entrez SP - 812 EP - 9 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 65 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Central pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common and often refractory to treatment. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, 5-week (1-week run-in, 4-week treatment), randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial in 66 patients with MS and central pain states (59 dysesthetic, seven painful spasms) of a whole-plant cannabis-based medicine (CBM), containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol:cannabidiol (THC:CBD) delivered via an oromucosal spray, as adjunctive analgesic treatment. Each spray delivered 2.7 mg of THC and 2.5 of CBD, and patients could gradually self-titrate to a maximum of 48 sprays in 24 hours. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients (97%) completed the trial, 34 received CBM. In week 4, the mean number of daily sprays taken of CBM (n = 32) was 9.6 (range 2 to 25, SD = 6.0) and of placebo (n = 31) was 19.1 (range 1 to 47, SD = 12.9). Pain and sleep disturbance were recorded daily on an 11-point numerical rating scale. CBM was superior to placebo in reducing the mean intensity of pain (CBM mean change -2.7, 95% CI: -3.4 to -2.0, placebo -1.4 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.8, comparison between groups, p = 0.005) and sleep disturbance (CBM mean change -2.5, 95% CI: -3.4 to -1.7, placebo -0.8, 95% CI: -1.5 to -0.1, comparison between groups, p = 0.003). CBM was generally well tolerated, although more patients on CBM than placebo reported dizziness, dry mouth, and somnolence. Cognitive side effects were limited to long-term memory storage. CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis-based medicine is effective in reducing pain and sleep disturbance in patients with multiple sclerosis related central neuropathic pain and is mostly well tolerated. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16186518/Randomized_controlled_trial_of_cannabis_based_medicine_in_central_pain_in_multiple_sclerosis_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16186518 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -