Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Low levels of carotenoids and retinol in involutional osteoporosis.
Bone. 2006 Feb; 38(2):244-8.BONE

Abstract

Previous epidemiological studies conducted in retinol-supplemented subjects showed an association between high serum levels or dietary intake of retinol and risk of hip fracture. On the other side, observational studies revealed that non-supplemented subjects with higher dietary intake of retinol lose less bone with age than subjects with lower intake. This discrepancy, currently unexplained, suggests that nutrition plays a major role in conditioning the effects of retinol on bone. Since retinol is derived from both retinoids--contained in animal food--and carotenoids--contained in vegetables and fruits--we evaluated a possible role of carotenoids in involutional osteoporosis. Therefore, plasma levels of beta-carotene and other carotenoids, in addition to those of retinol, were measured in free-living, non-supplemented, elderly women with or without severe osteoporosis. Plasma levels of retinol and of all carotenoids tested, with the exception of lutein, were consistently lower in osteoporotic than in control women. A weak association was found only between retinol and femoral neck bone mineral density in osteoporotic women. Our study suggests a bone sparing effect of retinol, to which the provitamin A activity of some carotenoids might have contributed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, University of Perugia, Policlinico Monteluce, Via Brunamonti, 06124 Perugia, Italy. dariomaggio1@tin.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16188508

Citation

Maggio, Dario, et al. "Low Levels of Carotenoids and Retinol in Involutional Osteoporosis." Bone, vol. 38, no. 2, 2006, pp. 244-8.
Maggio D, Polidori MC, Barabani M, et al. Low levels of carotenoids and retinol in involutional osteoporosis. Bone. 2006;38(2):244-8.
Maggio, D., Polidori, M. C., Barabani, M., Tufi, A., Ruggiero, C., Cecchetti, R., Aisa, M. C., Stahl, W., & Cherubini, A. (2006). Low levels of carotenoids and retinol in involutional osteoporosis. Bone, 38(2), 244-8.
Maggio D, et al. Low Levels of Carotenoids and Retinol in Involutional Osteoporosis. Bone. 2006;38(2):244-8. PubMed PMID: 16188508.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low levels of carotenoids and retinol in involutional osteoporosis. AU - Maggio,Dario, AU - Polidori,M Cristina, AU - Barabani,Mauro, AU - Tufi,Angela, AU - Ruggiero,Carmelinda, AU - Cecchetti,Roberta, AU - Aisa,M Cristina, AU - Stahl,Wilhelm, AU - Cherubini,Antonio, Y1 - 2005/09/26/ PY - 2005/04/07/received PY - 2005/07/07/revised PY - 2005/08/09/accepted PY - 2005/9/29/pubmed PY - 2006/8/11/medline PY - 2005/9/29/entrez SP - 244 EP - 8 JF - Bone JO - Bone VL - 38 IS - 2 N2 - Previous epidemiological studies conducted in retinol-supplemented subjects showed an association between high serum levels or dietary intake of retinol and risk of hip fracture. On the other side, observational studies revealed that non-supplemented subjects with higher dietary intake of retinol lose less bone with age than subjects with lower intake. This discrepancy, currently unexplained, suggests that nutrition plays a major role in conditioning the effects of retinol on bone. Since retinol is derived from both retinoids--contained in animal food--and carotenoids--contained in vegetables and fruits--we evaluated a possible role of carotenoids in involutional osteoporosis. Therefore, plasma levels of beta-carotene and other carotenoids, in addition to those of retinol, were measured in free-living, non-supplemented, elderly women with or without severe osteoporosis. Plasma levels of retinol and of all carotenoids tested, with the exception of lutein, were consistently lower in osteoporotic than in control women. A weak association was found only between retinol and femoral neck bone mineral density in osteoporotic women. Our study suggests a bone sparing effect of retinol, to which the provitamin A activity of some carotenoids might have contributed. SN - 8756-3282 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16188508/Low_levels_of_carotenoids_and_retinol_in_involutional_osteoporosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S8756-3282(05)00331-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -