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Associations of dietary flavonoids with risk of type 2 diabetes, and markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation in women: a prospective study and cross-sectional analysis.
J Am Coll Nutr 2005; 24(5):376-84JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Flavonoids, as antioxidants, may prevent the progressive impairment of pancreatic beta-cell function due to oxidative stress and may thus reduce the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of dietary flavonol and flavone intake with type 2 diabetes, and biomarkers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation.

METHODS

In 38,018 women aged > or =45 y and free of cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes with an average 8.8 y of follow-up, we calculated relative risks (RRs) of incident type 2 diabetes (1,614 events) according to dietary intake of total or individual flavonols and flavones and flavonoid-rich foods. We also measured and examined plasma concentrations of insulin, HbA(1C), CRP, and IL-6 in relation to total flavonol and flavone intake among 344 nondiabetic women.

RESULTS

During 332,905 person-years of follow-up, none of total flavonols and flavones, quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, apigenin, and luteolin was significantly associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. Among flavonoid-rich foods, apple and tea consumption was associated with diabetes risk. Women consuming > or =1 apple/d showed a significant 28% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes compared with those who consumed no apples (the multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.92; p = 0.006 for trend). Tea consumption was also inversely associated with diabetes risk but with a borderline significant trend (> or =4 cups/d vs. none: RR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.52-1.01; p for trend = 0.06). In 344 nondiabetic women, total intake of flavonols and flavones was not significantly related to plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, HbA(1C), CRP, or IL-6.

CONCLUSIONS

These results do not support the hypothesis that high intake of flavonols and flavones reduces the development of type 2 diabetes, although we cannot rule out a modest inverse association with intake of apples and tea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02215, USA. ysong@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16192263

Citation

Song, Yiqing, et al. "Associations of Dietary Flavonoids With Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, and Markers of Insulin Resistance and Systemic Inflammation in Women: a Prospective Study and Cross-sectional Analysis." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 24, no. 5, 2005, pp. 376-84.
Song Y, Manson JE, Buring JE, et al. Associations of dietary flavonoids with risk of type 2 diabetes, and markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation in women: a prospective study and cross-sectional analysis. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005;24(5):376-84.
Song, Y., Manson, J. E., Buring, J. E., Sesso, H. D., & Liu, S. (2005). Associations of dietary flavonoids with risk of type 2 diabetes, and markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation in women: a prospective study and cross-sectional analysis. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 24(5), pp. 376-84.
Song Y, et al. Associations of Dietary Flavonoids With Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, and Markers of Insulin Resistance and Systemic Inflammation in Women: a Prospective Study and Cross-sectional Analysis. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005;24(5):376-84. PubMed PMID: 16192263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of dietary flavonoids with risk of type 2 diabetes, and markers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation in women: a prospective study and cross-sectional analysis. AU - Song,Yiqing, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Sesso,Howard D, AU - Liu,Simin, PY - 2005/9/30/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/9/30/entrez SP - 376 EP - 84 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Flavonoids, as antioxidants, may prevent the progressive impairment of pancreatic beta-cell function due to oxidative stress and may thus reduce the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of dietary flavonol and flavone intake with type 2 diabetes, and biomarkers of insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. METHODS: In 38,018 women aged > or =45 y and free of cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes with an average 8.8 y of follow-up, we calculated relative risks (RRs) of incident type 2 diabetes (1,614 events) according to dietary intake of total or individual flavonols and flavones and flavonoid-rich foods. We also measured and examined plasma concentrations of insulin, HbA(1C), CRP, and IL-6 in relation to total flavonol and flavone intake among 344 nondiabetic women. RESULTS: During 332,905 person-years of follow-up, none of total flavonols and flavones, quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, apigenin, and luteolin was significantly associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. Among flavonoid-rich foods, apple and tea consumption was associated with diabetes risk. Women consuming > or =1 apple/d showed a significant 28% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes compared with those who consumed no apples (the multivariate-adjusted RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.92; p = 0.006 for trend). Tea consumption was also inversely associated with diabetes risk but with a borderline significant trend (> or =4 cups/d vs. none: RR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.52-1.01; p for trend = 0.06). In 344 nondiabetic women, total intake of flavonols and flavones was not significantly related to plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, HbA(1C), CRP, or IL-6. CONCLUSIONS: These results do not support the hypothesis that high intake of flavonols and flavones reduces the development of type 2 diabetes, although we cannot rule out a modest inverse association with intake of apples and tea. SN - 0731-5724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16192263/Associations_of_dietary_flavonoids_with_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_and_markers_of_insulin_resistance_and_systemic_inflammation_in_women:_a_prospective_study_and_cross_sectional_analysis_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2005.10719488 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -