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[Body mass index: sensitivity and specificity].
Acta Med Port. 2004 Sep-Oct; 17(5):353-8.AM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Self-reported height and weight data have been used in several studies with the purpose of determining the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Despite being a simple methodology, little information exists about the reliability of these measures, namely, in university students. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported body mass index (BMI) to evaluate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in university students.

METHODS

In a convenience sample of 380 university students (226 women and 154 men), weight and height were obtained by self-reported measures and anthropometric assessment according to international standards methodology (objective). BMI was calculated from self-reported and direct measures.

RESULTS

The discrepancy between objective and self-reported weight was not significative. For height, this discrepancy was significantly different in women, in men, and between genders. The difference between BMI values was significantly different in women (0.8 +/- 1.1 kg/m2), in men (0.4 +/- 1.1 kg/m2) and between genders. Concerning overweight and obesity, according to the objective BMI, the sensitivity was only 50% in women, and 70% in men, while the specificity was 99% in women and 98% in men.

CONCLUSION

Our results show a poor sensitivity of self-reported weight and height data, to estimate overweight and obesity, thus, this method might not be reliable for studies of prevalence of obesity in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculdade de Ciências da Nutrição e Alimentação, Universidade do Porto, Porto.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

por

PubMed ID

16197841

Citation

Clemente, Linda, et al. "[Body Mass Index: Sensitivity and Specificity]." Acta Medica Portuguesa, vol. 17, no. 5, 2004, pp. 353-8.
Clemente L, Moreira P, Oliveira B, et al. [Body mass index: sensitivity and specificity]. Acta Med Port. 2004;17(5):353-8.
Clemente, L., Moreira, P., Oliveira, B., & Almeida, M. D. (2004). [Body mass index: sensitivity and specificity]. Acta Medica Portuguesa, 17(5), 353-8.
Clemente L, et al. [Body Mass Index: Sensitivity and Specificity]. Acta Med Port. 2004 Sep-Oct;17(5):353-8. PubMed PMID: 16197841.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Body mass index: sensitivity and specificity]. AU - Clemente,Linda, AU - Moreira,Pedro, AU - Oliveira,Bruno, AU - Almeida,Maria Daniel Vaz de, Y1 - 2004/12/20/ PY - 2005/10/4/pubmed PY - 2006/3/8/medline PY - 2005/10/4/entrez SP - 353 EP - 8 JF - Acta medica portuguesa JO - Acta Med Port VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Self-reported height and weight data have been used in several studies with the purpose of determining the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Despite being a simple methodology, little information exists about the reliability of these measures, namely, in university students. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported body mass index (BMI) to evaluate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in university students. METHODS: In a convenience sample of 380 university students (226 women and 154 men), weight and height were obtained by self-reported measures and anthropometric assessment according to international standards methodology (objective). BMI was calculated from self-reported and direct measures. RESULTS: The discrepancy between objective and self-reported weight was not significative. For height, this discrepancy was significantly different in women, in men, and between genders. The difference between BMI values was significantly different in women (0.8 +/- 1.1 kg/m2), in men (0.4 +/- 1.1 kg/m2) and between genders. Concerning overweight and obesity, according to the objective BMI, the sensitivity was only 50% in women, and 70% in men, while the specificity was 99% in women and 98% in men. CONCLUSION: Our results show a poor sensitivity of self-reported weight and height data, to estimate overweight and obesity, thus, this method might not be reliable for studies of prevalence of obesity in this population. SN - 1646-0758 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16197841/[Body_mass_index:_sensitivity_and_specificity]_ L2 - http://www.actamedicaportuguesa.com/revista/index.php/amp/article/view/1113/778 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -