Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Combined lifestyle modification and metformin in obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multicentre study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It has been reported that women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) benefit from metformin therapy.

METHODS

A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of obese (body mass index >30 kg/m2), oligo-/amenorrhoeic women with PCOS. Metformin (850 mg) twice daily was compared with placebo over 6 months. All received the same advice from a dietitian. The primary outcome measures were: (i) change in menstrual cycle; (ii) change in arthropometric measurements; and (iii) changes in the endocrine parameters, insulin sensitivity and lipid profile.

RESULTS

A total of 143 subjects was randomized [metformin (MET) = 69; placebo (PL) = 74]. Both groups showed significant improvements in menstrual frequency [median increase (MET = 1, P < 0.001; PL = 1, P < 0.001)] and weight loss [mean (kg) (MET = 2.84; P < 0.001 and PL = 1.46; P = 0.011)]. However, there were no significant differences between the groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyse the independent variables (metformin, percentage of weight loss, initial BMI and age) in order to predict the improvement of menses. Only the percentage weight loss correlated with an improvement in menses (regression coefficient = 0.199, P = 0.047, odds ratio = 1.126, 95% CI 1.001, 1.266). There were no significant changes in insulin sensitivity or lipid profiles in either of the groups. Those who received metformin achieved a significant reduction in waist circumference and free androgen index.

CONCLUSIONS

Metformin does not improve weight loss or menstrual frequency in obese patients with PCOS. Weight loss alone through lifestyle changes improves menstrual frequency.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Reproductive Medicine, Clarendon Wing, The General Infirmary, Leeds LS2 9NS, UK.

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Anthropometry
    Double-Blind Method
    Female
    Humans
    Hypoglycemic Agents
    Insulin Resistance
    Life Style
    Lipids
    Menstruation
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Metformin
    Obesity
    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Pregnancy
    Pregnancy Rate
    Treatment Outcome
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16199429

    Citation

    Tang, Thomas, et al. "Combined Lifestyle Modification and Metformin in Obese Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. a Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Double-blind Multicentre Study." Human Reproduction (Oxford, England), vol. 21, no. 1, 2006, pp. 80-9.
    Tang T, Glanville J, Hayden CJ, et al. Combined lifestyle modification and metformin in obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multicentre study. Hum Reprod. 2006;21(1):80-9.
    Tang, T., Glanville, J., Hayden, C. J., White, D., Barth, J. H., & Balen, A. H. (2006). Combined lifestyle modification and metformin in obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multicentre study. Human Reproduction (Oxford, England), 21(1), pp. 80-9.
    Tang T, et al. Combined Lifestyle Modification and Metformin in Obese Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. a Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Double-blind Multicentre Study. Hum Reprod. 2006;21(1):80-9. PubMed PMID: 16199429.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Combined lifestyle modification and metformin in obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multicentre study. AU - Tang,Thomas, AU - Glanville,Julie, AU - Hayden,Catherine J, AU - White,Davinia, AU - Barth,Julian H, AU - Balen,Adam H, Y1 - 2005/09/30/ PY - 2005/10/4/pubmed PY - 2006/2/28/medline PY - 2005/10/4/entrez SP - 80 EP - 9 JF - Human reproduction (Oxford, England) JO - Hum. Reprod. VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: It has been reported that women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) benefit from metformin therapy. METHODS: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of obese (body mass index >30 kg/m2), oligo-/amenorrhoeic women with PCOS. Metformin (850 mg) twice daily was compared with placebo over 6 months. All received the same advice from a dietitian. The primary outcome measures were: (i) change in menstrual cycle; (ii) change in arthropometric measurements; and (iii) changes in the endocrine parameters, insulin sensitivity and lipid profile. RESULTS: A total of 143 subjects was randomized [metformin (MET) = 69; placebo (PL) = 74]. Both groups showed significant improvements in menstrual frequency [median increase (MET = 1, P < 0.001; PL = 1, P < 0.001)] and weight loss [mean (kg) (MET = 2.84; P < 0.001 and PL = 1.46; P = 0.011)]. However, there were no significant differences between the groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyse the independent variables (metformin, percentage of weight loss, initial BMI and age) in order to predict the improvement of menses. Only the percentage weight loss correlated with an improvement in menses (regression coefficient = 0.199, P = 0.047, odds ratio = 1.126, 95% CI 1.001, 1.266). There were no significant changes in insulin sensitivity or lipid profiles in either of the groups. Those who received metformin achieved a significant reduction in waist circumference and free androgen index. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin does not improve weight loss or menstrual frequency in obese patients with PCOS. Weight loss alone through lifestyle changes improves menstrual frequency. SN - 0268-1161 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16199429/Combined_lifestyle_modification_and_metformin_in_obese_patients_with_polycystic_ovary_syndrome__A_randomized_placebo_controlled_double_blind_multicentre_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/humrep/dei311 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -