Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bone mineral density differences between adolescent dancers and non-exercising adolescent females.
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2005 Oct; 18(5):337-42.JP

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE

To compare the bone mineral density (BMD) of the axial and appendicular skeleton between regularly exercising collegiate dancers and age matched non-exercising young females between the age of 17 and 19 to assess the impact of weight-bearing exercises and menstrual status on BMD.

DESIGN

Prospective observational cohort.

SETTING

Sports clinic in a collegiate school of dance and a hospital-based adolescent clinic.

PARTICIPANTS

The adolescent dancers consisted of full-time collegiate dance students from a tertiary Performing Arts Institute (n = 35). The non-exercising controls consisted of eumenorrhoeic patients of the same age presenting to the Adolescent Clinic (n = 35).

INTERVENTIONS

All subjects had a full hormonal profile, bio-impedance estimation of body fat, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative peripheral CT scans (pQCT) to determine bone density.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Comparison of the mean bone mineral density in the axial and appendicular skeleton between the two groups.

RESULTS

The incidence of oligo/amenorrhoea in the dancers was 20%. The lumbar spine BMD (1.006 g/cm(2) vs. 0.938, P = 0.048) and hip BMD (neck of femur 0.978 g/cm(2) vs. 0.838, P < 0.001; Ward's triangle 0.816 g/cm(2) vs. 0.720, P = 0.003; trochanter 0.777 g/cm(2) vs. 0.682; P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the eumenorrhoeic dancers as compared to controls. The radial BMD as measured by pQCT did not differ between the two groups, but the core trabecular tibial BMD was also higher in the dancers (321 mg/cm(3) vs. 286, P = 0.006). When only oligo/amenorrhoeic dancers (n = 7) were compared with the controls, the same differences in BMD values were no longer observed.

CONCLUSION

Young women undergoing regular intensive weight-bearing exercises as in the collegiate dancers here studied have higher BMD in the axial and appendicular skeleton as compared to non-exercising females of the same age if they remain eumenorrhoeic during their training. This advantage was apparently lost when they developed oligo/amenorrhoea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, United Christian Hospital, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong. towkw@ha.org.hkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16202937

Citation

To, William W K., et al. "Bone Mineral Density Differences Between Adolescent Dancers and Non-exercising Adolescent Females." Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, vol. 18, no. 5, 2005, pp. 337-42.
To WW, Wong MW, Lam IY. Bone mineral density differences between adolescent dancers and non-exercising adolescent females. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2005;18(5):337-42.
To, W. W., Wong, M. W., & Lam, I. Y. (2005). Bone mineral density differences between adolescent dancers and non-exercising adolescent females. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, 18(5), 337-42.
To WW, Wong MW, Lam IY. Bone Mineral Density Differences Between Adolescent Dancers and Non-exercising Adolescent Females. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2005;18(5):337-42. PubMed PMID: 16202937.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bone mineral density differences between adolescent dancers and non-exercising adolescent females. AU - To,William W K, AU - Wong,Margaret W N, AU - Lam,Ivy Y L, PY - 2005/10/6/pubmed PY - 2006/2/17/medline PY - 2005/10/6/entrez SP - 337 EP - 42 JF - Journal of pediatric and adolescent gynecology JO - J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare the bone mineral density (BMD) of the axial and appendicular skeleton between regularly exercising collegiate dancers and age matched non-exercising young females between the age of 17 and 19 to assess the impact of weight-bearing exercises and menstrual status on BMD. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort. SETTING: Sports clinic in a collegiate school of dance and a hospital-based adolescent clinic. PARTICIPANTS: The adolescent dancers consisted of full-time collegiate dance students from a tertiary Performing Arts Institute (n = 35). The non-exercising controls consisted of eumenorrhoeic patients of the same age presenting to the Adolescent Clinic (n = 35). INTERVENTIONS: All subjects had a full hormonal profile, bio-impedance estimation of body fat, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative peripheral CT scans (pQCT) to determine bone density. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of the mean bone mineral density in the axial and appendicular skeleton between the two groups. RESULTS: The incidence of oligo/amenorrhoea in the dancers was 20%. The lumbar spine BMD (1.006 g/cm(2) vs. 0.938, P = 0.048) and hip BMD (neck of femur 0.978 g/cm(2) vs. 0.838, P < 0.001; Ward's triangle 0.816 g/cm(2) vs. 0.720, P = 0.003; trochanter 0.777 g/cm(2) vs. 0.682; P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the eumenorrhoeic dancers as compared to controls. The radial BMD as measured by pQCT did not differ between the two groups, but the core trabecular tibial BMD was also higher in the dancers (321 mg/cm(3) vs. 286, P = 0.006). When only oligo/amenorrhoeic dancers (n = 7) were compared with the controls, the same differences in BMD values were no longer observed. CONCLUSION: Young women undergoing regular intensive weight-bearing exercises as in the collegiate dancers here studied have higher BMD in the axial and appendicular skeleton as compared to non-exercising females of the same age if they remain eumenorrhoeic during their training. This advantage was apparently lost when they developed oligo/amenorrhoea. SN - 1083-3188 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16202937/Bone_mineral_density_differences_between_adolescent_dancers_and_non_exercising_adolescent_females_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -