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Intimate partner violence and mental health consequences in women attending family practice in Spain.
Psychosom Med. 2005 Sep-Oct; 67(5):791-7.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Despite the abundant literature on the consequences of intimate partner violence (IPV) on mental health, psychological abuse has rarely been considered, and the separate effects of the different types of IPV have been understudied. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between physical, psychological, and sexual IPV and women's mental health.

METHODS

The sample included 1402 randomly selected women attending general practice in Spain. Information about IPV, use of psychoactive drugs, psychological distress (measured with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire), and self-perceived health status was obtained through a self-administered structured questionnaire.

RESULTS

Lifetime IPV prevalence was 32%. All types of abuse were significantly associated with psychological distress, tranquilizers, and antidepressants use. Compared with never-abused women, those referring psychological abuse solely were more likely to present negative mental health indicators. Women reporting physical abuse presented worse self-perceived health than never-abused women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-2.91 for combined physical and psychological abuse; OR = 2.91; 95% CI = 1.73-4.91 for combined physical, psychological, and sexual abuse). Women referring the 3 types of abuse were the most likely to present impaired mental health. Increased intensity and duration of some abusive experiences also led to increased levels of association with poor mental health.

CONCLUSIONS

This study underlines that different types of IPV can affect mental health differently. Results also show that IPV can be present even when there are no physical injuries and highlight the need for clinicians to screen for psychological, as well as physical and sexual, IPV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Andalusian School of Public Health, Granada, Spain. isabel.ruiz.easp@juntadeandalucia.esNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16204440

Citation

Ruiz-Pérez, Isabel, and Juncal Plazaola-Castaño. "Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Consequences in Women Attending Family Practice in Spain." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 67, no. 5, 2005, pp. 791-7.
Ruiz-Pérez I, Plazaola-Castaño J. Intimate partner violence and mental health consequences in women attending family practice in Spain. Psychosom Med. 2005;67(5):791-7.
Ruiz-Pérez, I., & Plazaola-Castaño, J. (2005). Intimate partner violence and mental health consequences in women attending family practice in Spain. Psychosomatic Medicine, 67(5), 791-7.
Ruiz-Pérez I, Plazaola-Castaño J. Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Consequences in Women Attending Family Practice in Spain. Psychosom Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;67(5):791-7. PubMed PMID: 16204440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence and mental health consequences in women attending family practice in Spain. AU - Ruiz-Pérez,Isabel, AU - Plazaola-Castaño,Juncal, PY - 2005/10/6/pubmed PY - 2006/7/19/medline PY - 2005/10/6/entrez SP - 791 EP - 7 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 67 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Despite the abundant literature on the consequences of intimate partner violence (IPV) on mental health, psychological abuse has rarely been considered, and the separate effects of the different types of IPV have been understudied. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between physical, psychological, and sexual IPV and women's mental health. METHODS: The sample included 1402 randomly selected women attending general practice in Spain. Information about IPV, use of psychoactive drugs, psychological distress (measured with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire), and self-perceived health status was obtained through a self-administered structured questionnaire. RESULTS: Lifetime IPV prevalence was 32%. All types of abuse were significantly associated with psychological distress, tranquilizers, and antidepressants use. Compared with never-abused women, those referring psychological abuse solely were more likely to present negative mental health indicators. Women reporting physical abuse presented worse self-perceived health than never-abused women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-2.91 for combined physical and psychological abuse; OR = 2.91; 95% CI = 1.73-4.91 for combined physical, psychological, and sexual abuse). Women referring the 3 types of abuse were the most likely to present impaired mental health. Increased intensity and duration of some abusive experiences also led to increased levels of association with poor mental health. CONCLUSIONS: This study underlines that different types of IPV can affect mental health differently. Results also show that IPV can be present even when there are no physical injuries and highlight the need for clinicians to screen for psychological, as well as physical and sexual, IPV. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16204440/Intimate_partner_violence_and_mental_health_consequences_in_women_attending_family_practice_in_Spain_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.psy.0000181269.11979.cd DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -