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Alexithymia after traumatic brain injury: its relation to magnetic resonance imaging findings and psychiatric disorders.
Psychosom Med. 2005 Sep-Oct; 67(5):807-12.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

People with traumatic brain injury (TBI) were studied to assess the prevalence of alexithymia and its relationship to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and psychiatric disorders.

METHODS

Fifty-four participants, 67% men, were evaluated after a median of 30 years since TBI. A control group was matched for age, gender, and severity of depression. Alexithymia was measured with the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). In patients with TBI, axis I psychiatric disorders were assessed with the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN, version 2.1), and axis II disorders with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders (SCID-II). MRI examinations were carried out with a 1.5 T MRI scanner.

RESULTS

Alexithymia was significantly more common in patients with TBI than in controls (31.5% versus 14.8%; odds ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 1.03-6.80). None of the variables representing TBI, ie, severity of TBI or the presence, laterality, or location of contusions on MRI, was associated with the TAS-20 total scores. Several current axis I and II psychiatric disorders, particularly organic personality syndrome, were connected to higher TAS-20 scores.

CONCLUSION

Alexithymia is common, along with psychiatric disorders, in patients with TBI. Both of them may reflect dysfunction of the injured brain. In clinical practice, alexithymic features should be taken into consideration in psychosocial rehabilitation after TBI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. salla.koponen@utu.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16204442

Citation

Koponen, Salla, et al. "Alexithymia After Traumatic Brain Injury: Its Relation to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and Psychiatric Disorders." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 67, no. 5, 2005, pp. 807-12.
Koponen S, Taiminen T, Honkalampi K, et al. Alexithymia after traumatic brain injury: its relation to magnetic resonance imaging findings and psychiatric disorders. Psychosom Med. 2005;67(5):807-12.
Koponen, S., Taiminen, T., Honkalampi, K., Joukamaa, M., Viinamäki, H., Kurki, T., Portin, R., Himanen, L., Isoniemi, H., Hinkka, S., & Tenovuo, O. (2005). Alexithymia after traumatic brain injury: its relation to magnetic resonance imaging findings and psychiatric disorders. Psychosomatic Medicine, 67(5), 807-12.
Koponen S, et al. Alexithymia After Traumatic Brain Injury: Its Relation to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and Psychiatric Disorders. Psychosom Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;67(5):807-12. PubMed PMID: 16204442.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alexithymia after traumatic brain injury: its relation to magnetic resonance imaging findings and psychiatric disorders. AU - Koponen,Salla, AU - Taiminen,Tero, AU - Honkalampi,Kirsi, AU - Joukamaa,Matti, AU - Viinamäki,Heimo, AU - Kurki,Timo, AU - Portin,Raija, AU - Himanen,Leena, AU - Isoniemi,Heli, AU - Hinkka,Susanna, AU - Tenovuo,Olli, PY - 2005/10/6/pubmed PY - 2006/7/19/medline PY - 2005/10/6/entrez SP - 807 EP - 12 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 67 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: People with traumatic brain injury (TBI) were studied to assess the prevalence of alexithymia and its relationship to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and psychiatric disorders. METHODS: Fifty-four participants, 67% men, were evaluated after a median of 30 years since TBI. A control group was matched for age, gender, and severity of depression. Alexithymia was measured with the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). In patients with TBI, axis I psychiatric disorders were assessed with the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN, version 2.1), and axis II disorders with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders (SCID-II). MRI examinations were carried out with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. RESULTS: Alexithymia was significantly more common in patients with TBI than in controls (31.5% versus 14.8%; odds ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 1.03-6.80). None of the variables representing TBI, ie, severity of TBI or the presence, laterality, or location of contusions on MRI, was associated with the TAS-20 total scores. Several current axis I and II psychiatric disorders, particularly organic personality syndrome, were connected to higher TAS-20 scores. CONCLUSION: Alexithymia is common, along with psychiatric disorders, in patients with TBI. Both of them may reflect dysfunction of the injured brain. In clinical practice, alexithymic features should be taken into consideration in psychosocial rehabilitation after TBI. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16204442/Alexithymia_after_traumatic_brain_injury:_its_relation_to_magnetic_resonance_imaging_findings_and_psychiatric_disorders_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.psy.0000181278.92249.e5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -