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Illnesses caused by marine toxins.
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 01; 41(9):1290-6.CI

Abstract

Marine toxins are produced by algae or bacteria and are concentrated in contaminated seafood. Substantial increases in seafood consumption in recent years, together with globalization of the seafood trade, have increased potential exposure to these agents. Marine toxins produce neurological, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular syndromes, some of which result in high mortality and long-term morbidity. Routine clinical diagnostic tests are not available for these toxins; diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and a history of eating seafood in the preceding 24 h. There is no antidote for any of the marine toxins, and supportive care is the mainstay of treatment. In particular, paralytic shellfish poisoning and puffer fish poisoning can cause death within hours after consuming the toxins and may require immediate intensive care. Rapid notification of public health authorities is essential, because timely investigation may identify the source of contaminated seafood and prevent additional illnesses. Extensive environmental monitoring and sometimes seasonal quarantine of a harvest are employed to reduce the risk of exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. jsobel@cdc.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16206104

Citation

Sobel, Jeremy, and John Painter. "Illnesses Caused By Marine Toxins." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 41, no. 9, 2005, pp. 1290-6.
Sobel J, Painter J. Illnesses caused by marine toxins. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;41(9):1290-6.
Sobel, J., & Painter, J. (2005). Illnesses caused by marine toxins. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 41(9), 1290-6.
Sobel J, Painter J. Illnesses Caused By Marine Toxins. Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 1;41(9):1290-6. PubMed PMID: 16206104.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Illnesses caused by marine toxins. AU - Sobel,Jeremy, AU - Painter,John, Y1 - 2005/09/21/ PY - 2005/04/19/received PY - 2005/06/24/accepted PY - 2005/10/6/pubmed PY - 2006/7/14/medline PY - 2005/10/6/entrez SP - 1290 EP - 6 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 41 IS - 9 N2 - Marine toxins are produced by algae or bacteria and are concentrated in contaminated seafood. Substantial increases in seafood consumption in recent years, together with globalization of the seafood trade, have increased potential exposure to these agents. Marine toxins produce neurological, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular syndromes, some of which result in high mortality and long-term morbidity. Routine clinical diagnostic tests are not available for these toxins; diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and a history of eating seafood in the preceding 24 h. There is no antidote for any of the marine toxins, and supportive care is the mainstay of treatment. In particular, paralytic shellfish poisoning and puffer fish poisoning can cause death within hours after consuming the toxins and may require immediate intensive care. Rapid notification of public health authorities is essential, because timely investigation may identify the source of contaminated seafood and prevent additional illnesses. Extensive environmental monitoring and sometimes seasonal quarantine of a harvest are employed to reduce the risk of exposure. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16206104/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/496926 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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