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Posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion in children with previous spinal fusions. Technical note.
J Neurosurg. 2005 Jan; 102(1 Suppl):119-22.JN

Abstract

Intrathecal baclofen pumps for the management of severe spasticity are being used more often in children with cerebral palsy. The intrathecal catheter is traditionally introduced dorsally in the lumbar region. In some children with previous thoracolumbar fusions for scoliosis, the fusion mass obviates the introduction of the intrathecal catheter. The authors describe their experience with a posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion in three patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy who had previously undergone thoracolumbar fusions for scoliosis. Insertion was successful in all three patients; no complications of catheter disconnection, catheter dislodgment, or cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred. Follow-up review ranged from 10 to 28 months postoperatively (mean 17 months). The posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion is a safe and effective alternative for patients who have previously undergone thoracolumbar spine fusions and in whom the traditional lumbar approach is not feasible.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Primary Children's Medical Center, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah 84113, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16206746

Citation

Liu, James K., and Marion L. Walker. "Posterior Cervical Approach for Intrathecal Baclofen Pump Insertion in Children With Previous Spinal Fusions. Technical Note." Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 102, no. 1 Suppl, 2005, pp. 119-22.
Liu JK, Walker ML. Posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion in children with previous spinal fusions. Technical note. J Neurosurg. 2005;102(1 Suppl):119-22.
Liu, J. K., & Walker, M. L. (2005). Posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion in children with previous spinal fusions. Technical note. Journal of Neurosurgery, 102(1 Suppl), 119-22.
Liu JK, Walker ML. Posterior Cervical Approach for Intrathecal Baclofen Pump Insertion in Children With Previous Spinal Fusions. Technical Note. J Neurosurg. 2005;102(1 Suppl):119-22. PubMed PMID: 16206746.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion in children with previous spinal fusions. Technical note. AU - Liu,James K, AU - Walker,Marion L, PY - 2005/10/7/pubmed PY - 2005/10/20/medline PY - 2005/10/7/entrez SP - 119 EP - 22 JF - Journal of neurosurgery JO - J. Neurosurg. VL - 102 IS - 1 Suppl N2 - Intrathecal baclofen pumps for the management of severe spasticity are being used more often in children with cerebral palsy. The intrathecal catheter is traditionally introduced dorsally in the lumbar region. In some children with previous thoracolumbar fusions for scoliosis, the fusion mass obviates the introduction of the intrathecal catheter. The authors describe their experience with a posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion in three patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy who had previously undergone thoracolumbar fusions for scoliosis. Insertion was successful in all three patients; no complications of catheter disconnection, catheter dislodgment, or cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred. Follow-up review ranged from 10 to 28 months postoperatively (mean 17 months). The posterior cervical approach for intrathecal baclofen pump insertion is a safe and effective alternative for patients who have previously undergone thoracolumbar spine fusions and in whom the traditional lumbar approach is not feasible. SN - 0022-3085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16206746/Posterior_cervical_approach_for_intrathecal_baclofen_pump_insertion_in_children_with_previous_spinal_fusions__Technical_note_ L2 - https://thejns.org/doi/10.3171/ped.2005.102.1.0119 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -