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Treatment choices and experiences in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder: relations to parents' beliefs and attributions.
Child Care Health Dev 2005; 31(6):669-77CC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite their potential to influence treatment decisions, parents' beliefs and attitudes regarding attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have not been widely studied. This research examined relations between parents' beliefs and attitudes and their experiences with different treatments for their children's ADHD.

METHODS

Canadian parents of 73, 5- to 13-year-old, boys with ADHD completed questionnaires measuring beliefs about ADHD, attributions for ADHD behaviours, and treatment experiences.

RESULTS

Parents reported using primarily behaviour management and stimulant medications in treating ADHD. Approximately half of the families also used diet/vitamin therapies. Parents were knowledgeable about ADHD and held generally accurate beliefs. They saw ADHD symptoms as predominantly internal to the child and as relatively enduring and pervasive. Parents' beliefs were related to their use of different treatments and parents who used less empirically supported treatments were more likely to see ADHD behaviours as internal to the child, enduring and pervasive.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings highlight the importance of assessing parents' use of alternate treatments for ADHD and the potential role of parents' beliefs and attributions in shaping treatment choices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. cjohnston@psych.ubc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16207224

Citation

Johnston, C, et al. "Treatment Choices and Experiences in Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder: Relations to Parents' Beliefs and Attributions." Child: Care, Health and Development, vol. 31, no. 6, 2005, pp. 669-77.
Johnston C, Seipp C, Hommersen P, et al. Treatment choices and experiences in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder: relations to parents' beliefs and attributions. Child Care Health Dev. 2005;31(6):669-77.
Johnston, C., Seipp, C., Hommersen, P., Hoza, B., & Fine, S. (2005). Treatment choices and experiences in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder: relations to parents' beliefs and attributions. Child: Care, Health and Development, 31(6), pp. 669-77.
Johnston C, et al. Treatment Choices and Experiences in Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder: Relations to Parents' Beliefs and Attributions. Child Care Health Dev. 2005;31(6):669-77. PubMed PMID: 16207224.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment choices and experiences in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder: relations to parents' beliefs and attributions. AU - Johnston,C, AU - Seipp,C, AU - Hommersen,P, AU - Hoza,B, AU - Fine,S, PY - 2005/10/7/pubmed PY - 2006/2/1/medline PY - 2005/10/7/entrez SP - 669 EP - 77 JF - Child: care, health and development JO - Child Care Health Dev VL - 31 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite their potential to influence treatment decisions, parents' beliefs and attitudes regarding attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have not been widely studied. This research examined relations between parents' beliefs and attitudes and their experiences with different treatments for their children's ADHD. METHODS: Canadian parents of 73, 5- to 13-year-old, boys with ADHD completed questionnaires measuring beliefs about ADHD, attributions for ADHD behaviours, and treatment experiences. RESULTS: Parents reported using primarily behaviour management and stimulant medications in treating ADHD. Approximately half of the families also used diet/vitamin therapies. Parents were knowledgeable about ADHD and held generally accurate beliefs. They saw ADHD symptoms as predominantly internal to the child and as relatively enduring and pervasive. Parents' beliefs were related to their use of different treatments and parents who used less empirically supported treatments were more likely to see ADHD behaviours as internal to the child, enduring and pervasive. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight the importance of assessing parents' use of alternate treatments for ADHD and the potential role of parents' beliefs and attributions in shaping treatment choices. SN - 0305-1862 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16207224/Treatment_choices_and_experiences_in_attention_deficit_and_hyperactivity_disorder:_relations_to_parents'_beliefs_and_attributions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2005.00555.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -