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How do CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control autoimmunity?
Curr Opin Immunol 2005; 17(6):638-42CO

Abstract

Any scientist opening up an immunology journal today will observe immediately that suppressor T cells, renamed 'regulatory T cells' (Tregs) have become a central concept in the immunology lexicon. Hundreds of Treg publications over the past few years have validated the existence of this unique T cell lineage armed with an ability to regulate autoimmunity. The CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg subset develops in the thymus, can be induced in the periphery during the course of normal immune responses and utilizes a T cell repertoire skewed towards autoantigens. Despite these advances, however, there is still controversy over their mechanism of action. This confusion stems from the differences observed in in vitro versus in vivo studies. Recent in vivo analyses support a model in which Tregs directly or indirectly alter the activation and differentiation of pathogenic T cells through an effect on antigen presenting cells.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California at San Francisco Diabetes Center, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143-0540, USA. jbluest@diabetes.ucsf.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16209918

Citation

Bluestone, Jeffrey A., and Qizhi Tang. "How Do CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Control Autoimmunity?" Current Opinion in Immunology, vol. 17, no. 6, 2005, pp. 638-42.
Bluestone JA, Tang Q. How do CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control autoimmunity? Curr Opin Immunol. 2005;17(6):638-42.
Bluestone, J. A., & Tang, Q. (2005). How do CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control autoimmunity? Current Opinion in Immunology, 17(6), pp. 638-42.
Bluestone JA, Tang Q. How Do CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Control Autoimmunity. Curr Opin Immunol. 2005;17(6):638-42. PubMed PMID: 16209918.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How do CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control autoimmunity? AU - Bluestone,Jeffrey A, AU - Tang,Qizhi, Y1 - 2005/10/04/ PY - 2005/08/08/received PY - 2005/09/21/accepted PY - 2005/10/8/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/10/8/entrez SP - 638 EP - 42 JF - Current opinion in immunology JO - Curr. Opin. Immunol. VL - 17 IS - 6 N2 - Any scientist opening up an immunology journal today will observe immediately that suppressor T cells, renamed 'regulatory T cells' (Tregs) have become a central concept in the immunology lexicon. Hundreds of Treg publications over the past few years have validated the existence of this unique T cell lineage armed with an ability to regulate autoimmunity. The CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg subset develops in the thymus, can be induced in the periphery during the course of normal immune responses and utilizes a T cell repertoire skewed towards autoantigens. Despite these advances, however, there is still controversy over their mechanism of action. This confusion stems from the differences observed in in vitro versus in vivo studies. Recent in vivo analyses support a model in which Tregs directly or indirectly alter the activation and differentiation of pathogenic T cells through an effect on antigen presenting cells. SN - 0952-7915 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16209918/How_do_CD4+CD25+_regulatory_T_cells_control_autoimmunity L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0952-7915(05)00154-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -