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IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 Oct; 116(4):744-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

IgE-mediated sensitization is usually considered a dichotomous variable (either sensitized or not). Quantitative IgE antibody analysis may better predict the expression of wheeze.

OBJECTIVE

Within the context of a population-based birth cohort, we investigated the association among wheeze, lung function, and specific IgE antibody levels.

METHODS

Children (n = 521) were followed to age 5 years with repeated questionnaires, skin testing, and measurement of lung function (specific airway resistance) and specific serum IgE (ImmunoCAP).

RESULTS

Using specific IgE as a continuous variable, the risk of current wheeze increased significantly with increasing IgE to mite, cat, and dog (P < .0001). When IgE levels to these 3 allergens were summed, the probability of current wheeze increased 1.33-fold (95% CI, 1.21-1.47; P < .0001) per logarithmic unit increase, corresponding to an odds ratio of 3.1 at 10 and 4.25 at 30 kU(A)/L (kilo units of Allergen per liter). Similarly, increasing sum of mite-specific, cat-specific, and dog-specific IgE was associated with reduced lung function (P = .004). Among sensitized children (n = 184), the sum of mite, cat, and dog IgE was the strongest associate of current wheeze (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.46; P < .001), corresponding to an odds ratio of 2.56 at 10 and 3.32 at 30 kU(A)/L. There was no association between current wheeze and the size of skin test wheal. Furthermore, the sum of IgE to mite, cat, and dog at age 3 years increased the risk of persistent wheeze by age 5 years (2.15-fold/logarithmic unit increase in the specific IgE).

CONCLUSION

IgE-mediated sensitization is not an all or nothing phenomenon. The probability of wheeze and reduced lung function increases with increasing specific IgE antibody levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

North West Lung Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom. a.simpson@fs1.with.man.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16210045

Citation

Simpson, Angela, et al. "IgE Antibody Quantification and the Probability of Wheeze in Preschool Children." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 116, no. 4, 2005, pp. 744-9.
Simpson A, Soderstrom L, Ahlstedt S, et al. IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005;116(4):744-9.
Simpson, A., Soderstrom, L., Ahlstedt, S., Murray, C. S., Woodcock, A., & Custovic, A. (2005). IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 116(4), 744-9.
Simpson A, et al. IgE Antibody Quantification and the Probability of Wheeze in Preschool Children. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005;116(4):744-9. PubMed PMID: 16210045.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children. AU - Simpson,Angela, AU - Soderstrom,Lars, AU - Ahlstedt,Staffan, AU - Murray,Clare S, AU - Woodcock,Ashley, AU - Custovic,Adnan, Y1 - 2005/08/08/ PY - 2005/01/21/received PY - 2005/06/21/revised PY - 2005/06/27/accepted PY - 2005/10/8/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/10/8/entrez SP - 744 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 116 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated sensitization is usually considered a dichotomous variable (either sensitized or not). Quantitative IgE antibody analysis may better predict the expression of wheeze. OBJECTIVE: Within the context of a population-based birth cohort, we investigated the association among wheeze, lung function, and specific IgE antibody levels. METHODS: Children (n = 521) were followed to age 5 years with repeated questionnaires, skin testing, and measurement of lung function (specific airway resistance) and specific serum IgE (ImmunoCAP). RESULTS: Using specific IgE as a continuous variable, the risk of current wheeze increased significantly with increasing IgE to mite, cat, and dog (P < .0001). When IgE levels to these 3 allergens were summed, the probability of current wheeze increased 1.33-fold (95% CI, 1.21-1.47; P < .0001) per logarithmic unit increase, corresponding to an odds ratio of 3.1 at 10 and 4.25 at 30 kU(A)/L (kilo units of Allergen per liter). Similarly, increasing sum of mite-specific, cat-specific, and dog-specific IgE was associated with reduced lung function (P = .004). Among sensitized children (n = 184), the sum of mite, cat, and dog IgE was the strongest associate of current wheeze (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.46; P < .001), corresponding to an odds ratio of 2.56 at 10 and 3.32 at 30 kU(A)/L. There was no association between current wheeze and the size of skin test wheal. Furthermore, the sum of IgE to mite, cat, and dog at age 3 years increased the risk of persistent wheeze by age 5 years (2.15-fold/logarithmic unit increase in the specific IgE). CONCLUSION: IgE-mediated sensitization is not an all or nothing phenomenon. The probability of wheeze and reduced lung function increases with increasing specific IgE antibody levels. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16210045/IgE_antibody_quantification_and_the_probability_of_wheeze_in_preschool_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(05)01532-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -