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High-fat dairy food and conjugated linoleic acid intakes in relation to colorectal cancer incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.
Am J Clin Nutr 2005; 82(4):894-900AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High-fat dairy foods contain many potentially anticarcinogenic factors, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). However, few epidemiologic studies have specifically evaluated high-fat dairy food consumption, and none have evaluated CLA intake, in relation to colorectal cancer risk.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the associations of long-term high-fat dairy food consumption and CLA intake and the incidence of colorectal cancer.

DESIGN

Our study population consisted of 60 708 women aged 40-76 y who participated in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. The women's consumption of high-fat dairy foods was assessed at baseline, which was from 1987 to 1990, and again in 1997.

RESULTS

We ascertained 798 incident cases of colorectal cancer during an average 14.8 y of follow-up. After adjustment for age and other potential confounders, the women who consumed > or =4 servings of high-fat dairy foods/d (including whole milk, full-fat cultured milk, cheese, cream, sour cream, and butter) had a multivariate rate ratio of colorectal cancer of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.79; P for trend = 0.002) when compared with the women who consumed <1 serving/d. Each increment of 2 servings of high-fat dairy foods/d corresponded to a 13% reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate rate ratio: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.96). For CLA, the multivariate rate ratio of colorectal cancer in a comparison of the 2 extreme quartiles of intake was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.91; P for trend = 0.004).

CONCLUSION

These prospective data suggest that high intakes of high-fat dairy foods and CLA may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, the National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@imm.ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16210722

Citation

Larsson, Susanna C., et al. "High-fat Dairy Food and Conjugated Linoleic Acid Intakes in Relation to Colorectal Cancer Incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 82, no. 4, 2005, pp. 894-900.
Larsson SC, Bergkvist L, Wolk A. High-fat dairy food and conjugated linoleic acid intakes in relation to colorectal cancer incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;82(4):894-900.
Larsson, S. C., Bergkvist, L., & Wolk, A. (2005). High-fat dairy food and conjugated linoleic acid intakes in relation to colorectal cancer incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 82(4), pp. 894-900.
Larsson SC, Bergkvist L, Wolk A. High-fat Dairy Food and Conjugated Linoleic Acid Intakes in Relation to Colorectal Cancer Incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;82(4):894-900. PubMed PMID: 16210722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-fat dairy food and conjugated linoleic acid intakes in relation to colorectal cancer incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Bergkvist,Leif, AU - Wolk,Alicja, PY - 2005/10/8/pubmed PY - 2005/11/9/medline PY - 2005/10/8/entrez SP - 894 EP - 900 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 82 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: High-fat dairy foods contain many potentially anticarcinogenic factors, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). However, few epidemiologic studies have specifically evaluated high-fat dairy food consumption, and none have evaluated CLA intake, in relation to colorectal cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the associations of long-term high-fat dairy food consumption and CLA intake and the incidence of colorectal cancer. DESIGN: Our study population consisted of 60 708 women aged 40-76 y who participated in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. The women's consumption of high-fat dairy foods was assessed at baseline, which was from 1987 to 1990, and again in 1997. RESULTS: We ascertained 798 incident cases of colorectal cancer during an average 14.8 y of follow-up. After adjustment for age and other potential confounders, the women who consumed > or =4 servings of high-fat dairy foods/d (including whole milk, full-fat cultured milk, cheese, cream, sour cream, and butter) had a multivariate rate ratio of colorectal cancer of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.79; P for trend = 0.002) when compared with the women who consumed <1 serving/d. Each increment of 2 servings of high-fat dairy foods/d corresponded to a 13% reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate rate ratio: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.96). For CLA, the multivariate rate ratio of colorectal cancer in a comparison of the 2 extreme quartiles of intake was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.91; P for trend = 0.004). CONCLUSION: These prospective data suggest that high intakes of high-fat dairy foods and CLA may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16210722/High_fat_dairy_food_and_conjugated_linoleic_acid_intakes_in_relation_to_colorectal_cancer_incidence_in_the_Swedish_Mammography_Cohort_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/82.4.894 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -