Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Leg ulceration in sickle cell disease: medieval medicine in a modern world.
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2005; 19(5):943-56, viii-ixHO

Abstract

Leg ulceration is now recognized as an important complication of sickle cell disease, especially of the SS genotype. Since there is no convincing evidence of delayed healing of operation scars or of wounds elsewhere in the body, it must be concluded that factors specific to the lower leg render patients prone to delayed healing at this site. Many lesions are traumatic in origin and since there is considerable variation in healing rates among the normal population, it is useful to define chronic leg ulceration on the basis of a minimal duration, which in Jamaican studies has required at least 3 months and sometimes 6 months before healing. This minimal duration avoids the difficulties of interpreting the significance of briefer lesions since the moment of final healing may be poorly defined (patients may conclude that a scab represents healing whereas small lesions persist beneath) and often goes undocumented as patients may not report and medical attendants may not enquire, the date of final healing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies. grserjeant@cwjamaica.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16214654

Citation

Serjeant, Graham R., et al. "Leg Ulceration in Sickle Cell Disease: Medieval Medicine in a Modern World." Hematology/oncology Clinics of North America, vol. 19, no. 5, 2005, pp. 943-56, viii-ix.
Serjeant GR, Serjeant BE, Mohan JS, et al. Leg ulceration in sickle cell disease: medieval medicine in a modern world. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2005;19(5):943-56, viii-ix.
Serjeant, G. R., Serjeant, B. E., Mohan, J. S., & Clare, A. (2005). Leg ulceration in sickle cell disease: medieval medicine in a modern world. Hematology/oncology Clinics of North America, 19(5), pp. 943-56, viii-ix.
Serjeant GR, et al. Leg Ulceration in Sickle Cell Disease: Medieval Medicine in a Modern World. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2005;19(5):943-56, viii-ix. PubMed PMID: 16214654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leg ulceration in sickle cell disease: medieval medicine in a modern world. AU - Serjeant,Graham R, AU - Serjeant,Beryl E, AU - Mohan,Junette S, AU - Clare,Andrea, PY - 2005/10/11/pubmed PY - 2006/2/8/medline PY - 2005/10/11/entrez SP - 943-56, viii-ix JF - Hematology/oncology clinics of North America JO - Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am. VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - Leg ulceration is now recognized as an important complication of sickle cell disease, especially of the SS genotype. Since there is no convincing evidence of delayed healing of operation scars or of wounds elsewhere in the body, it must be concluded that factors specific to the lower leg render patients prone to delayed healing at this site. Many lesions are traumatic in origin and since there is considerable variation in healing rates among the normal population, it is useful to define chronic leg ulceration on the basis of a minimal duration, which in Jamaican studies has required at least 3 months and sometimes 6 months before healing. This minimal duration avoids the difficulties of interpreting the significance of briefer lesions since the moment of final healing may be poorly defined (patients may conclude that a scab represents healing whereas small lesions persist beneath) and often goes undocumented as patients may not report and medical attendants may not enquire, the date of final healing. SN - 0889-8588 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16214654/Leg_ulceration_in_sickle_cell_disease:_medieval_medicine_in_a_modern_world_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-8588(05)00095-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -