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A review of nutrition in human immunodeficiency virus infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.
Nutr Clin Pract 2004; 19(4):340-55NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nutrition complications of HIV infection, including wasting syndrome, nutrient deficiencies, and metabolic complications, have been well documented over the last 25 years.

METHODS

A systematic review of the literature was performed using the keywords HIV; nutrition; nutrition support; vitamins A, B, C, and E; selenium; zinc; and glutamine through MEDLINE using Medscape and PubMed.

RESULTS

Although no accurate prediction equations exist for determining energy needs in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the Harris-Benedict equation with a 1.3 stress factor has been used for weight maintenance. Some experts recommend protein requirements of 1.0 to 1.4 g/kg for maintenance and 1.5 to 2.0 g/kg for anabolism. There is a general consensus that all individuals with HIV benefit from a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement at levels of 100% of the US recommended daily intake (RDI). Nutrition therapy for HIV wasting is similar to that for other chronic diseases and begins with nutrition counseling. For persistent weight loss, standard oral supplements may be useful. The benefit of specialized supplements has yet to be proven. Enteral and parenteral nutrition support has produced positive outcomes related to mortality and quality of life in patients with HIV.

CONCLUSIONS

Although the benefit of providing adequate amounts of calories, protein, and micronutrients for persons with HIV is well accepted, the exact amounts of nutrients and optimal feeding modalities are less clear. Long-term clinical trials are needed to provide more conclusive data on nutrition intervention in HIV infection, particularly related to supplementation of specific nutrients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90509, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16215125

Citation

Coyne-Meyers, Kristen, and Lisa E. Trombley. "A Review of Nutrition in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 19, no. 4, 2004, pp. 340-55.
Coyne-Meyers K, Trombley LE. A review of nutrition in human immunodeficiency virus infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Nutr Clin Pract. 2004;19(4):340-55.
Coyne-Meyers, K., & Trombley, L. E. (2004). A review of nutrition in human immunodeficiency virus infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 19(4), pp. 340-55.
Coyne-Meyers K, Trombley LE. A Review of Nutrition in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. Nutr Clin Pract. 2004;19(4):340-55. PubMed PMID: 16215125.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A review of nutrition in human immunodeficiency virus infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. AU - Coyne-Meyers,Kristen, AU - Trombley,Lisa E, PY - 2005/10/11/pubmed PY - 2005/10/11/medline PY - 2005/10/11/entrez SP - 340 EP - 55 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 19 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nutrition complications of HIV infection, including wasting syndrome, nutrient deficiencies, and metabolic complications, have been well documented over the last 25 years. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the keywords HIV; nutrition; nutrition support; vitamins A, B, C, and E; selenium; zinc; and glutamine through MEDLINE using Medscape and PubMed. RESULTS: Although no accurate prediction equations exist for determining energy needs in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the Harris-Benedict equation with a 1.3 stress factor has been used for weight maintenance. Some experts recommend protein requirements of 1.0 to 1.4 g/kg for maintenance and 1.5 to 2.0 g/kg for anabolism. There is a general consensus that all individuals with HIV benefit from a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement at levels of 100% of the US recommended daily intake (RDI). Nutrition therapy for HIV wasting is similar to that for other chronic diseases and begins with nutrition counseling. For persistent weight loss, standard oral supplements may be useful. The benefit of specialized supplements has yet to be proven. Enteral and parenteral nutrition support has produced positive outcomes related to mortality and quality of life in patients with HIV. CONCLUSIONS: Although the benefit of providing adequate amounts of calories, protein, and micronutrients for persons with HIV is well accepted, the exact amounts of nutrients and optimal feeding modalities are less clear. Long-term clinical trials are needed to provide more conclusive data on nutrition intervention in HIV infection, particularly related to supplementation of specific nutrients. SN - 0884-5336 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16215125/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0115426504019004340 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -