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Maggot debridement therapy: free-range or contained? An in-vivo study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine which method of maggot debridement therapy--free-range or contained--is more effective for wound healing.

METHODS

In vivo study of 64 patients with 69 chronic wounds that showed signs of gangrenous or necrotic tissue. Patients were treated with either free-range or contained maggot debridement therapy according to maggot availability, dressing difficulty, and physician preference.

RESULTS

Significantly better outcomes were achieved with the free-range technique versus the contained technique (P = .028). With the free-range technique, the mean number of maggot applications and the total number of maggots per treatment were significantly lower than with the contained application technique (P = .028 and P < .001, respectively).

CONCLUSION

This clinical in vivo study supports in vitro studies in which containment of maggots was found to reduce the effectiveness of maggot debridement therapy.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Surgery, Rijnland Hospital, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands.

    ,

    Source

    Advances in skin & wound care 18:8 2005 Oct pg 430-5

    MeSH

    Aged
    Animals
    Chronic Disease
    Debridement
    Female
    Humans
    Larva
    Male
    Necrosis
    Wound Healing
    Wounds and Injuries

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16217155

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Maggot debridement therapy: free-range or contained? An in-vivo study. AU - Steenvoorde,Pascal, AU - Jacobi,Cathrien E, AU - Oskam,Jacques, PY - 2005/10/12/pubmed PY - 2006/3/15/medline PY - 2005/10/12/entrez SP - 430 EP - 5 JF - Advances in skin & wound care JO - Adv Skin Wound Care VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine which method of maggot debridement therapy--free-range or contained--is more effective for wound healing. METHODS: In vivo study of 64 patients with 69 chronic wounds that showed signs of gangrenous or necrotic tissue. Patients were treated with either free-range or contained maggot debridement therapy according to maggot availability, dressing difficulty, and physician preference. RESULTS: Significantly better outcomes were achieved with the free-range technique versus the contained technique (P = .028). With the free-range technique, the mean number of maggot applications and the total number of maggots per treatment were significantly lower than with the contained application technique (P = .028 and P < .001, respectively). CONCLUSION: This clinical in vivo study supports in vitro studies in which containment of maggots was found to reduce the effectiveness of maggot debridement therapy. SN - 1527-7941 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16217155/full_citation/Maggot_debridement_therapy:_free_range_or_contained_An_in_vivo_study L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16217155 ER -