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[Hazards of mountain climbing and hiking].
MMW Fortschr Med. 2005 Sep 22; 147(38):28-30, 32.MF

Abstract

At elevations above 1500 m, even a healthy person undergoes acclimatization. To avoid problems such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), the speed of ascent and the daily sleeping elevation are of primary importance. Mild symptoms and peripheral swelling are usually harmless. However, when the severity of altitude sickness progresses, rapid therapy and immediate transport to lower elevations can be life-saving under certain conditions. A sojourn in the mountains requires effective preparation and prophylaxis against oxygen deficiency, increased UV radiation, as well as against the possibility of hypothermia and frostbite.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pneumologie, Medizinische Klinik der Universität München. rainald.fischer@med.uni-muenchen.de

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

ger

PubMed ID

16218225

Citation

Fischer, Rainald. "[Hazards of Mountain Climbing and Hiking]." MMW Fortschritte Der Medizin, vol. 147, no. 38, 2005, pp. 28-30, 32.
Fischer R. [Hazards of mountain climbing and hiking]. MMW Fortschr Med. 2005;147(38):28-30, 32.
Fischer, R. (2005). [Hazards of mountain climbing and hiking]. MMW Fortschritte Der Medizin, 147(38), 28-30, 32.
Fischer R. [Hazards of Mountain Climbing and Hiking]. MMW Fortschr Med. 2005 Sep 22;147(38):28-30, 32. PubMed PMID: 16218225.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Hazards of mountain climbing and hiking]. A1 - Fischer,Rainald, PY - 2005/10/13/pubmed PY - 2005/12/15/medline PY - 2005/10/13/entrez SP - 28-30, 32 JF - MMW Fortschritte der Medizin JO - MMW Fortschr Med VL - 147 IS - 38 N2 - At elevations above 1500 m, even a healthy person undergoes acclimatization. To avoid problems such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), the speed of ascent and the daily sleeping elevation are of primary importance. Mild symptoms and peripheral swelling are usually harmless. However, when the severity of altitude sickness progresses, rapid therapy and immediate transport to lower elevations can be life-saving under certain conditions. A sojourn in the mountains requires effective preparation and prophylaxis against oxygen deficiency, increased UV radiation, as well as against the possibility of hypothermia and frostbite. SN - 1438-3276 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16218225/[Hazards_of_mountain_climbing_and_hiking]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/frostbite.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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