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The acculturation gap-distress hypothesis among high-risk Mexican American families.
J Fam Psychol. 2005 Sep; 19(3):367-75.JF

Abstract

The authors tested the acculturation gap-distress hypothesis by examining whether parent-adolescent acculturation gaps were associated with greater conflict and youth conduct problems among 260 high-risk Mexican American families. The authors operationalized acculturation gaps in 2 ways: parent-youth mismatches in acculturation style, and parent-youth discrepancies in acculturation toward both mainstream and heritage cultures. Acculturation gaps were common, but results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that parent-youth discrepancies in acculturation toward mainstream and heritage cultures were not related to increased conflict or youth conduct problems. Conduct problems were no higher in families in which the adolescent was more aligned with mainstream culture than the parent. Unexpectedly, the authors found more youth conduct problems in families in which the youth was more aligned with traditional culture than the parent. The results call into question the assumption that the more rapid acculturation of adolescents to American culture inevitably leads to distress in minority families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA. alau@psych.ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16221017

Citation

Lau, Anna S., et al. "The Acculturation Gap-distress Hypothesis Among High-risk Mexican American Families." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 19, no. 3, 2005, pp. 367-75.
Lau AS, McCabe KM, Yeh M, et al. The acculturation gap-distress hypothesis among high-risk Mexican American families. J Fam Psychol. 2005;19(3):367-75.
Lau, A. S., McCabe, K. M., Yeh, M., Garland, A. F., Wood, P. A., & Hough, R. L. (2005). The acculturation gap-distress hypothesis among high-risk Mexican American families. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 19(3), 367-75.
Lau AS, et al. The Acculturation Gap-distress Hypothesis Among High-risk Mexican American Families. J Fam Psychol. 2005;19(3):367-75. PubMed PMID: 16221017.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The acculturation gap-distress hypothesis among high-risk Mexican American families. AU - Lau,Anna S, AU - McCabe,Kristen M, AU - Yeh,May, AU - Garland,Ann F, AU - Wood,Patricia A, AU - Hough,Richard L, PY - 2005/10/14/pubmed PY - 2006/1/6/medline PY - 2005/10/14/entrez SP - 367 EP - 75 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - The authors tested the acculturation gap-distress hypothesis by examining whether parent-adolescent acculturation gaps were associated with greater conflict and youth conduct problems among 260 high-risk Mexican American families. The authors operationalized acculturation gaps in 2 ways: parent-youth mismatches in acculturation style, and parent-youth discrepancies in acculturation toward both mainstream and heritage cultures. Acculturation gaps were common, but results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that parent-youth discrepancies in acculturation toward mainstream and heritage cultures were not related to increased conflict or youth conduct problems. Conduct problems were no higher in families in which the adolescent was more aligned with mainstream culture than the parent. Unexpectedly, the authors found more youth conduct problems in families in which the youth was more aligned with traditional culture than the parent. The results call into question the assumption that the more rapid acculturation of adolescents to American culture inevitably leads to distress in minority families. SN - 0893-3200 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16221017/The_acculturation_gap_distress_hypothesis_among_high_risk_Mexican_American_families_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/19/3/367 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -