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Exercise training and depression in older adults.
Neurobiol Aging 2005; 26 Suppl 1:119-23NA

Abstract

This article provides a review of the evidence supporting exercise as an effective treatment of depression in older adults. Depression is prevalent among older adults and is associated with significant morbidity, increased risk of mortality, and economic burden. Although effective treatments for depression exist (e.g., antidepressant medication, cognitive-behavioral therapy), the disorder remains inadequately treated for many older individuals. Recently, the use of exercise as a treatment for depression has received increased attention. Results of these studies suggest that exercise leads to a reduction in depressive symptoms when compared to wait list, social contact controls, and antidepressant medication. However, many studies have significant methodological limitations. In the present article, we include discussion of these limitations and provide suggestions for future research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3119, Durham, NC 27710, USA. barbo024@mc.duke.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16223547

Citation

Barbour, Krista A., and James A. Blumenthal. "Exercise Training and Depression in Older Adults." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 26 Suppl 1, 2005, pp. 119-23.
Barbour KA, Blumenthal JA. Exercise training and depression in older adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2005;26 Suppl 1:119-23.
Barbour, K. A., & Blumenthal, J. A. (2005). Exercise training and depression in older adults. Neurobiology of Aging, 26 Suppl 1, pp. 119-23.
Barbour KA, Blumenthal JA. Exercise Training and Depression in Older Adults. Neurobiol Aging. 2005;26 Suppl 1:119-23. PubMed PMID: 16223547.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise training and depression in older adults. AU - Barbour,Krista A, AU - Blumenthal,James A, Y1 - 2005/10/11/ PY - 2005/08/18/received PY - 2005/09/05/accepted PY - 2005/10/15/pubmed PY - 2006/3/15/medline PY - 2005/10/15/entrez SP - 119 EP - 23 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol. Aging VL - 26 Suppl 1 N2 - This article provides a review of the evidence supporting exercise as an effective treatment of depression in older adults. Depression is prevalent among older adults and is associated with significant morbidity, increased risk of mortality, and economic burden. Although effective treatments for depression exist (e.g., antidepressant medication, cognitive-behavioral therapy), the disorder remains inadequately treated for many older individuals. Recently, the use of exercise as a treatment for depression has received increased attention. Results of these studies suggest that exercise leads to a reduction in depressive symptoms when compared to wait list, social contact controls, and antidepressant medication. However, many studies have significant methodological limitations. In the present article, we include discussion of these limitations and provide suggestions for future research. SN - 0197-4580 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16223547/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(05)00271-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -