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Role of nasogastric tube in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with dysphagia.
Singapore Med J. 2005 Nov; 46(11):627-31.SM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Every year, a large number of patients with dysphagia are placed on feeding tubes to prevent aspiration pneumonia. This prospective study was planned to compare the incidence of aspiration pneumonia and death in patients with dysphagia who were either fed orally or through a nasogastric tube.

METHODS

All patients aged 65 years or older, at the point of discharge from the geriatric medicine ward of a hospital, were recruited over a six-month period with a two-month follow-up. Patients diagnosed with dysphagia by the speech therapist were recommended to have either oral feeding with modified diet or nasogastric tube feeding. The incidence of aspiration pneumonia and death among patients on oral feeding, nasogastric tube feeding and patients who refused nasogastric tube feeding were compared.

RESULTS

A total of 122 patients completed the study. The rate of aspiration pneumonia and death were, respectively, 31.2 percent in nasogastric tube-fed patients and 10.3 percent in orally-fed patients (Fisher's exact test, p-value equals 0.007). Multivariate analysis showed that the mode of feeding predicted outcome (p-value equals 0.03). The rate of aspiration pneumonia and death were 31.2 percent in nasogastric tube-fed patients and 11.5 percent in those who refused nasogastric tube feeding (Fisher's exact test, p-value equals 0.064). Nasogastric tube-fed patients were more cognitively- and functionally-impaired compared to those on oral feeding.

CONCLUSION

In our study, patients on nasogastric tube feeding did not have a better outcome against aspiration pneumonia and mortality when compared to those who were on oral feeding. The poorer outcome of nasogastric tube-fed patients could be attributed to their worse cognitive and functional statuses. Larger studies are needed to refute or confirm the usefulness of nasogastric tube in elderly patients with dysphagia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Geriatric Medicine Unit, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore 169608. gdmkm@sgh.com.sgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16228094

Citation

Mamun, K, and J Lim. "Role of Nasogastric Tube in Preventing Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients With Dysphagia." Singapore Medical Journal, vol. 46, no. 11, 2005, pp. 627-31.
Mamun K, Lim J. Role of nasogastric tube in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with dysphagia. Singapore Med J. 2005;46(11):627-31.
Mamun, K., & Lim, J. (2005). Role of nasogastric tube in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with dysphagia. Singapore Medical Journal, 46(11), 627-31.
Mamun K, Lim J. Role of Nasogastric Tube in Preventing Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients With Dysphagia. Singapore Med J. 2005;46(11):627-31. PubMed PMID: 16228094.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of nasogastric tube in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with dysphagia. AU - Mamun,K, AU - Lim,J, PY - 2005/10/18/pubmed PY - 2006/1/18/medline PY - 2005/10/18/entrez SP - 627 EP - 31 JF - Singapore medical journal JO - Singapore Med J VL - 46 IS - 11 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Every year, a large number of patients with dysphagia are placed on feeding tubes to prevent aspiration pneumonia. This prospective study was planned to compare the incidence of aspiration pneumonia and death in patients with dysphagia who were either fed orally or through a nasogastric tube. METHODS: All patients aged 65 years or older, at the point of discharge from the geriatric medicine ward of a hospital, were recruited over a six-month period with a two-month follow-up. Patients diagnosed with dysphagia by the speech therapist were recommended to have either oral feeding with modified diet or nasogastric tube feeding. The incidence of aspiration pneumonia and death among patients on oral feeding, nasogastric tube feeding and patients who refused nasogastric tube feeding were compared. RESULTS: A total of 122 patients completed the study. The rate of aspiration pneumonia and death were, respectively, 31.2 percent in nasogastric tube-fed patients and 10.3 percent in orally-fed patients (Fisher's exact test, p-value equals 0.007). Multivariate analysis showed that the mode of feeding predicted outcome (p-value equals 0.03). The rate of aspiration pneumonia and death were 31.2 percent in nasogastric tube-fed patients and 11.5 percent in those who refused nasogastric tube feeding (Fisher's exact test, p-value equals 0.064). Nasogastric tube-fed patients were more cognitively- and functionally-impaired compared to those on oral feeding. CONCLUSION: In our study, patients on nasogastric tube feeding did not have a better outcome against aspiration pneumonia and mortality when compared to those who were on oral feeding. The poorer outcome of nasogastric tube-fed patients could be attributed to their worse cognitive and functional statuses. Larger studies are needed to refute or confirm the usefulness of nasogastric tube in elderly patients with dysphagia. SN - 0037-5675 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16228094/Role_of_nasogastric_tube_in_preventing_aspiration_pneumonia_in_patients_with_dysphagia_ L2 - http://www.sma.org.sg/smj/4611/4611a3.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -