Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cancer incidence among Danish seafarers: a population based cohort study.
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Nov; 62(11):761-5.OE

Abstract

AIMS

Seafarers aboard oil and chemical tankers may be exposed to many chemicals, including substances like benzene that are known to be carcinogenic. Other seafarers are exposed to engine exhaust, different oil products, and chemicals used aboard and some years ago asbestos was also used extensively in ships. The aim of this study was to study cancer morbidity among Danish seafarers in relation to type of ship and job title.

METHODS

A cohort of all Danish seafarers during 1986-1999 (33,340 men; 11,291 women) registered by the Danish Maritime Authority with an employment history was linked with the nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and followed up for cancer until the end of 2002. The number of person years at risk was 517,518. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) were estimated by use of the corresponding national rates.

RESULTS

The SIR of all cancers combined was higher than expected: 1.26 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.32) for men and 1.07 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.20) for women. This was mainly due to an excess of cancer of the larynx, lung, tongue, mouth, pharynx, oesophagus, pancreas, kidney, urinary bladder, colon, and bone as well as skin melanomas among men (the three latter borderline significantly increased), and an excess of cancer of the lung, rectum, and cervix uteri among women. The differences in risk pattern for lung cancer between the different job categories among men ranged in terms of SIR from 1.2 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.7) (engine officers) to 2.3 (1.6 to 3.3) (engine room crew), and 4.1 (2.1 to 7.4) among maintenance crew. Non-officers had a 1.5 times higher lung cancer risk than officers. No increased occurrence of all lymphatic and haematopoietic malignancies combined was found for employees on tankers, but the number of cases was limited to a total of 7.

CONCLUSIONS

Danish seafarers, especially men, face an increased overall cancer risk, in particular a risk for lung cancer and other tobacco associated cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Unit of Maritime Medicine at University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark. Lindak@FMM.SDU.DKNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16234401

Citation

Kaerlev, L, et al. "Cancer Incidence Among Danish Seafarers: a Population Based Cohort Study." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 62, no. 11, 2005, pp. 761-5.
Kaerlev L, Hansen J, Hansen HL, et al. Cancer incidence among Danish seafarers: a population based cohort study. Occup Environ Med. 2005;62(11):761-5.
Kaerlev, L., Hansen, J., Hansen, H. L., & Nielsen, P. S. (2005). Cancer incidence among Danish seafarers: a population based cohort study. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 62(11), 761-5.
Kaerlev L, et al. Cancer Incidence Among Danish Seafarers: a Population Based Cohort Study. Occup Environ Med. 2005;62(11):761-5. PubMed PMID: 16234401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cancer incidence among Danish seafarers: a population based cohort study. AU - Kaerlev,L, AU - Hansen,J, AU - Hansen,H L, AU - Nielsen,P S, PY - 2005/10/20/pubmed PY - 2005/11/16/medline PY - 2005/10/20/entrez SP - 761 EP - 5 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 62 IS - 11 N2 - AIMS: Seafarers aboard oil and chemical tankers may be exposed to many chemicals, including substances like benzene that are known to be carcinogenic. Other seafarers are exposed to engine exhaust, different oil products, and chemicals used aboard and some years ago asbestos was also used extensively in ships. The aim of this study was to study cancer morbidity among Danish seafarers in relation to type of ship and job title. METHODS: A cohort of all Danish seafarers during 1986-1999 (33,340 men; 11,291 women) registered by the Danish Maritime Authority with an employment history was linked with the nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and followed up for cancer until the end of 2002. The number of person years at risk was 517,518. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) were estimated by use of the corresponding national rates. RESULTS: The SIR of all cancers combined was higher than expected: 1.26 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.32) for men and 1.07 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.20) for women. This was mainly due to an excess of cancer of the larynx, lung, tongue, mouth, pharynx, oesophagus, pancreas, kidney, urinary bladder, colon, and bone as well as skin melanomas among men (the three latter borderline significantly increased), and an excess of cancer of the lung, rectum, and cervix uteri among women. The differences in risk pattern for lung cancer between the different job categories among men ranged in terms of SIR from 1.2 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.7) (engine officers) to 2.3 (1.6 to 3.3) (engine room crew), and 4.1 (2.1 to 7.4) among maintenance crew. Non-officers had a 1.5 times higher lung cancer risk than officers. No increased occurrence of all lymphatic and haematopoietic malignancies combined was found for employees on tankers, but the number of cases was limited to a total of 7. CONCLUSIONS: Danish seafarers, especially men, face an increased overall cancer risk, in particular a risk for lung cancer and other tobacco associated cancers. SN - 1470-7926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16234401/Cancer_incidence_among_Danish_seafarers:_a_population_based_cohort_study_ L2 - https://oem.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16234401 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -