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Rate of forearm bone loss is associated with an increased risk of fracture independently of bone mass in postmenopausal women: the OFELY study.
J Bone Miner Res. 2005 Nov; 20(11):1929-35.JB

Abstract

BMD is a major determinant of the risk of fragility fractures, but the role of the rate of postmenopausal bone loss is still unclear. In 671 postmenopausal women from the OFELY cohort, we found that the rate of bone loss was significantly associated with fracture risk independently of other well-known predictors including BMD and previous fractures.

INTRODUCTION

The level of BMD is a major determinant of the risk of fragility fractures, but the role of the rate of postmenopausal bone loss is still unclear.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

In the OFELY study, we analyzed the risk of fracture in 671 postmenopausal women (mean age, 62.2 +/- 9 years), according to the rate of bone loss. BMD was measured annually by DXA at the forearm, with a mean number of measurements of 10.3 +/- 2.6. Peripheral fractures, all confirmed by radiographs, were prospectively registered, and vertebral fractures were evaluated with spine radiographs every 4 years.

RESULTS

During a median (interquartile range [IQ]) of 11.2 years (11-12.3 years) of follow-up, 183 incident fragility fractures including 53 vertebral and 130 nonvertebral fractures were recorded in 134 women. The annual median +/- IQ rate of bone loss, calculated from the slope, was -0.30 +/- 0.76% at the mid-radius, -0.55 +/- 0.79% at the distal radius, and -0.40 +/- 0.96% at the ultradistal radius. Women with incident fracture had a rate of bone loss (before fracture) higher by 38-53% than those without fracture (p = 0.0003-0.016). Using multivariate Cox regression models, we found that bone loss in the highest tertile at the mid-radius, distal radius, and ultradistal radius was associated with a significant increased risk of all fractures with an hazard ratio from 1.45 to 1.70 (p = 0.02 to p = 0.009 after adjusting for age, previous fractures, maternal history of fracture, physical activity, grip strength, falls, and baseline BMD).

CONCLUSIONS

The rate of bone loss in postmenopausal women is significantly associated with fracture risk independently of other well-known predictors such as BMD and history of fractures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INSERM Research Unit 403 and Claude Bernard University, Lyon, France. rendu@lyon.inserm.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16234965

Citation

Sornay-Rendu, Elisabeth, et al. "Rate of Forearm Bone Loss Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Fracture Independently of Bone Mass in Postmenopausal Women: the OFELY Study." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 20, no. 11, 2005, pp. 1929-35.
Sornay-Rendu E, Munoz F, Duboeuf F, et al. Rate of forearm bone loss is associated with an increased risk of fracture independently of bone mass in postmenopausal women: the OFELY study. J Bone Miner Res. 2005;20(11):1929-35.
Sornay-Rendu, E., Munoz, F., Duboeuf, F., & Delmas, P. D. (2005). Rate of forearm bone loss is associated with an increased risk of fracture independently of bone mass in postmenopausal women: the OFELY study. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 20(11), 1929-35.
Sornay-Rendu E, et al. Rate of Forearm Bone Loss Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Fracture Independently of Bone Mass in Postmenopausal Women: the OFELY Study. J Bone Miner Res. 2005;20(11):1929-35. PubMed PMID: 16234965.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rate of forearm bone loss is associated with an increased risk of fracture independently of bone mass in postmenopausal women: the OFELY study. AU - Sornay-Rendu,Elisabeth, AU - Munoz,Françoise, AU - Duboeuf,François, AU - Delmas,Pierre D, Y1 - 2005/07/11/ PY - 2005/02/10/received PY - 2005/06/27/revised PY - 2005/07/05/accepted PY - 2005/10/20/pubmed PY - 2006/2/28/medline PY - 2005/10/20/entrez SP - 1929 EP - 35 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J Bone Miner Res VL - 20 IS - 11 N2 - UNLABELLED: BMD is a major determinant of the risk of fragility fractures, but the role of the rate of postmenopausal bone loss is still unclear. In 671 postmenopausal women from the OFELY cohort, we found that the rate of bone loss was significantly associated with fracture risk independently of other well-known predictors including BMD and previous fractures. INTRODUCTION: The level of BMD is a major determinant of the risk of fragility fractures, but the role of the rate of postmenopausal bone loss is still unclear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the OFELY study, we analyzed the risk of fracture in 671 postmenopausal women (mean age, 62.2 +/- 9 years), according to the rate of bone loss. BMD was measured annually by DXA at the forearm, with a mean number of measurements of 10.3 +/- 2.6. Peripheral fractures, all confirmed by radiographs, were prospectively registered, and vertebral fractures were evaluated with spine radiographs every 4 years. RESULTS: During a median (interquartile range [IQ]) of 11.2 years (11-12.3 years) of follow-up, 183 incident fragility fractures including 53 vertebral and 130 nonvertebral fractures were recorded in 134 women. The annual median +/- IQ rate of bone loss, calculated from the slope, was -0.30 +/- 0.76% at the mid-radius, -0.55 +/- 0.79% at the distal radius, and -0.40 +/- 0.96% at the ultradistal radius. Women with incident fracture had a rate of bone loss (before fracture) higher by 38-53% than those without fracture (p = 0.0003-0.016). Using multivariate Cox regression models, we found that bone loss in the highest tertile at the mid-radius, distal radius, and ultradistal radius was associated with a significant increased risk of all fractures with an hazard ratio from 1.45 to 1.70 (p = 0.02 to p = 0.009 after adjusting for age, previous fractures, maternal history of fracture, physical activity, grip strength, falls, and baseline BMD). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of bone loss in postmenopausal women is significantly associated with fracture risk independently of other well-known predictors such as BMD and history of fractures. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16234965/Rate_of_forearm_bone_loss_is_associated_with_an_increased_risk_of_fracture_independently_of_bone_mass_in_postmenopausal_women:_the_OFELY_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/JBMR.050704 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -