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Allium vegetables and stomach cancer risk in China.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2005 Jul-Sep; 6(3):387-95.AP

Abstract

Although the incidence of stomach cancer has been declining, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Potential protective effects of allium vegetables against cancer have been reported by a few epidemiologic studies in Chinese populations, but the sample sizes of these studies were relatively small. We examined the associations between allium vegetable consumption and stomach cancer in a large population-based case-control study in Shanghai (750 cases and 750 age- and gender-matched controls) and Qingdao (201 cases and 201 age- and gender-matched controls). Epidemiological data were collected by a standard questionnaire, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression in SAS. After adjusting for matching variables, education, body mass index, pack-years of smoking, alcohol drinking, salt intake, and fruit and vegetable intake, inverse relationships with dose response pattern were observed between frequency of onion intake and stomach cancer in Qingdao (P for trend=0.02) and Shanghai (P for trend=0.04) populations. In Shanghai, negative dose-response relationships were observed between monthly intake of onions (P=0.03) or garlic stalks (P=0.04) and distal, but not cardia cancer. A negative association was also noted between intake of garlic stalks (often vs. never) and risk of stomach cancer in Qingdao (OR=0.30; 95% CI: 0.12-0.77). Our results confirm protective effects of allium vegetables (especially garlic and onions) against stomach cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. vsetiawa@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16236005

Citation

Setiawan, Veronica Wendy, et al. "Allium Vegetables and Stomach Cancer Risk in China." Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention : APJCP, vol. 6, no. 3, 2005, pp. 387-95.
Setiawan VW, Yu GP, Lu QY, et al. Allium vegetables and stomach cancer risk in China. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2005;6(3):387-95.
Setiawan, V. W., Yu, G. P., Lu, Q. Y., Lu, M. L., Yu, S. Z., Mu, L., Zhang, J. G., Kurtz, R. C., Cai, L., Hsieh, C. C., & Zhang, Z. F. (2005). Allium vegetables and stomach cancer risk in China. Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention : APJCP, 6(3), 387-95.
Setiawan VW, et al. Allium Vegetables and Stomach Cancer Risk in China. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2005 Jul-Sep;6(3):387-95. PubMed PMID: 16236005.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Allium vegetables and stomach cancer risk in China. AU - Setiawan,Veronica Wendy, AU - Yu,Gao-Pei, AU - Lu,Qing-Yi, AU - Lu,Ming-Lan, AU - Yu,Shun-Zhang, AU - Mu,Lina, AU - Zhang,Jian-Guo, AU - Kurtz,Robert C, AU - Cai,Lin, AU - Hsieh,Chung-Cheng, AU - Zhang,Zuo-Feng, PY - 2005/10/21/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/10/21/entrez SP - 387 EP - 95 JF - Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP JO - Asian Pac J Cancer Prev VL - 6 IS - 3 N2 - Although the incidence of stomach cancer has been declining, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Potential protective effects of allium vegetables against cancer have been reported by a few epidemiologic studies in Chinese populations, but the sample sizes of these studies were relatively small. We examined the associations between allium vegetable consumption and stomach cancer in a large population-based case-control study in Shanghai (750 cases and 750 age- and gender-matched controls) and Qingdao (201 cases and 201 age- and gender-matched controls). Epidemiological data were collected by a standard questionnaire, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression in SAS. After adjusting for matching variables, education, body mass index, pack-years of smoking, alcohol drinking, salt intake, and fruit and vegetable intake, inverse relationships with dose response pattern were observed between frequency of onion intake and stomach cancer in Qingdao (P for trend=0.02) and Shanghai (P for trend=0.04) populations. In Shanghai, negative dose-response relationships were observed between monthly intake of onions (P=0.03) or garlic stalks (P=0.04) and distal, but not cardia cancer. A negative association was also noted between intake of garlic stalks (often vs. never) and risk of stomach cancer in Qingdao (OR=0.30; 95% CI: 0.12-0.77). Our results confirm protective effects of allium vegetables (especially garlic and onions) against stomach cancer. SN - 1513-7368 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16236005/Allium_vegetables_and_stomach_cancer_risk_in_China_ L2 - http://journal.waocp.org/?sid=Entrez:PubMed&id=pmid:16236005&key=2005.6.3.387 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -