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Leisure-time physical activity at midlife and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Physical activity may help maintain cognitive function and decrease dementia risk, but epidemiological findings remain controversial. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between leisure-time physical activity at midlife and the subsequent development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS

Participants were randomly selected from the survivors of a population-based cohort previously surveyed in 1972, 1977, 1982, or 1987. 1449 persons (72.5%) age 65-79 years participated in the re-examination in 1998 (mean follow-up, 21 years). 117 persons had dementia and 76 had AD. Multiple logistic regression methods were used to analyse the association between leisure-time physical activity and dementia or AD.

FINDINGS

Leisure-time physical activity at midlife at least twice a week was associated with a reduced risk of dementia and AD (odds ratio [OR] 0.48 [95% CI 0.25-0.91] and 0.38 [0.17-0.85], respectively), even after adjustments for age, sex, education, follow-up time, locomotor disorders, APOE genotype, vascular disorders, smoking, and alcohol drinking. The associations were more pronounced among the APOE epsilon4 carriers.

INTERPRETATION

Leisure-time physical activity at midlife is associated with a decreased risk of dementia and AD later in life. Regular physical activity may reduce the risk or delay the onset of dementia and AD, especially among genetically susceptible individuals.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Aging Research Center, Division of Geriatric Epidemiology, Neurotec, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

    , , , , , , ,

    Source

    The Lancet. Neurology 4:11 2005 Nov pg 705-11

    MeSH

    Aged
    Alzheimer Disease
    Apolipoprotein E4
    Apolipoproteins E
    Cohort Studies
    Data Collection
    Dementia
    Female
    Humans
    Leisure Activities
    Life Style
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Motor Activity
    Odds Ratio
    Regression Analysis
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16239176

    Citation

    Rovio, Suvi, et al. "Leisure-time Physical Activity at Midlife and the Risk of Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease." The Lancet. Neurology, vol. 4, no. 11, 2005, pp. 705-11.
    Rovio S, Kåreholt I, Helkala EL, et al. Leisure-time physical activity at midlife and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Lancet Neurol. 2005;4(11):705-11.
    Rovio, S., Kåreholt, I., Helkala, E. L., Viitanen, M., Winblad, B., Tuomilehto, J., ... Kivipelto, M. (2005). Leisure-time physical activity at midlife and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The Lancet. Neurology, 4(11), pp. 705-11.
    Rovio S, et al. Leisure-time Physical Activity at Midlife and the Risk of Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease. Lancet Neurol. 2005;4(11):705-11. PubMed PMID: 16239176.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Leisure-time physical activity at midlife and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. AU - Rovio,Suvi, AU - Kåreholt,Ingemar, AU - Helkala,Eeva-Liisa, AU - Viitanen,Matti, AU - Winblad,Bengt, AU - Tuomilehto,Jaakko, AU - Soininen,Hilkka, AU - Nissinen,Aulikki, AU - Kivipelto,Miia, PY - 2005/10/22/pubmed PY - 2005/11/16/medline PY - 2005/10/22/entrez SP - 705 EP - 11 JF - The Lancet. Neurology JO - Lancet Neurol VL - 4 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Physical activity may help maintain cognitive function and decrease dementia risk, but epidemiological findings remain controversial. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between leisure-time physical activity at midlife and the subsequent development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: Participants were randomly selected from the survivors of a population-based cohort previously surveyed in 1972, 1977, 1982, or 1987. 1449 persons (72.5%) age 65-79 years participated in the re-examination in 1998 (mean follow-up, 21 years). 117 persons had dementia and 76 had AD. Multiple logistic regression methods were used to analyse the association between leisure-time physical activity and dementia or AD. FINDINGS: Leisure-time physical activity at midlife at least twice a week was associated with a reduced risk of dementia and AD (odds ratio [OR] 0.48 [95% CI 0.25-0.91] and 0.38 [0.17-0.85], respectively), even after adjustments for age, sex, education, follow-up time, locomotor disorders, APOE genotype, vascular disorders, smoking, and alcohol drinking. The associations were more pronounced among the APOE epsilon4 carriers. INTERPRETATION: Leisure-time physical activity at midlife is associated with a decreased risk of dementia and AD later in life. Regular physical activity may reduce the risk or delay the onset of dementia and AD, especially among genetically susceptible individuals. SN - 1474-4422 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16239176/Leisure_time_physical_activity_at_midlife_and_the_risk_of_dementia_and_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1474-4422(05)70198-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -