Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bone loss associated with anorexia nervosa.
Joint Bone Spine 2005; 72(6):489-95JB

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of bone loss related to anorexia nervosa. Earlier onset and longer duration of anorexia nervosa are associated with more severe bone loss. Osteoporosis develops in 38-50% of cases. Bone mineral density measurement by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is useful for assessing bone mass, and bone marker assays provide information on bone turnover. Bone loss in anorexia nervosa is probably multifactorial. Estrogen deficiency was long felt to be the major factor. However, in contrast to postmenopausal osteoporosis, bone loss associated with anorexia nervosa is related mainly to inadequate bone formation, with only a slight increase in bone resorption. This suggests a role for nutritional factors, such as disturbances in the growth hormone-somatomedin C axis (GH/IGF-I) related to malnutrition. The best treatment strategy for correcting bone mass in patients with anorexia nervosa is not agreed on. Resumption of menstrual cycles and weight gain seem necessary but not always sufficient. Studies found no benefits with estrogen therapy, but this was usually given as estrogen-progestin contraceptives. No vast studies evaluating hormone replacement therapy have been reported. Bone formation enhancers such as IGF-I seem to provide the best results, most notably when used in combination with estrogens. This suggests that complex treatment strategies combining bone formation enhancers and bone resorption inhibitors may deserve evaluation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service de Rhumatologie, CHRU Lille, Hôpital Roger Salengro, 59037 Lille cedex, France. i-legroux@chru-lille.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16242373

Citation

Legroux-Gerot, Isabelle, et al. "Bone Loss Associated With Anorexia Nervosa." Joint, Bone, Spine : Revue Du Rhumatisme, vol. 72, no. 6, 2005, pp. 489-95.
Legroux-Gerot I, Vignau J, Collier F, et al. Bone loss associated with anorexia nervosa. Joint Bone Spine. 2005;72(6):489-95.
Legroux-Gerot, I., Vignau, J., Collier, F., & Cortet, B. (2005). Bone loss associated with anorexia nervosa. Joint, Bone, Spine : Revue Du Rhumatisme, 72(6), pp. 489-95.
Legroux-Gerot I, et al. Bone Loss Associated With Anorexia Nervosa. Joint Bone Spine. 2005;72(6):489-95. PubMed PMID: 16242373.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bone loss associated with anorexia nervosa. AU - Legroux-Gerot,Isabelle, AU - Vignau,Jean, AU - Collier,Francis, AU - Cortet,Bernard, PY - 2004/02/02/received PY - 2004/07/15/accepted PY - 2005/10/26/pubmed PY - 2006/4/15/medline PY - 2005/10/26/entrez SP - 489 EP - 95 JF - Joint, bone, spine : revue du rhumatisme JO - Joint Bone Spine VL - 72 IS - 6 N2 - The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of bone loss related to anorexia nervosa. Earlier onset and longer duration of anorexia nervosa are associated with more severe bone loss. Osteoporosis develops in 38-50% of cases. Bone mineral density measurement by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is useful for assessing bone mass, and bone marker assays provide information on bone turnover. Bone loss in anorexia nervosa is probably multifactorial. Estrogen deficiency was long felt to be the major factor. However, in contrast to postmenopausal osteoporosis, bone loss associated with anorexia nervosa is related mainly to inadequate bone formation, with only a slight increase in bone resorption. This suggests a role for nutritional factors, such as disturbances in the growth hormone-somatomedin C axis (GH/IGF-I) related to malnutrition. The best treatment strategy for correcting bone mass in patients with anorexia nervosa is not agreed on. Resumption of menstrual cycles and weight gain seem necessary but not always sufficient. Studies found no benefits with estrogen therapy, but this was usually given as estrogen-progestin contraceptives. No vast studies evaluating hormone replacement therapy have been reported. Bone formation enhancers such as IGF-I seem to provide the best results, most notably when used in combination with estrogens. This suggests that complex treatment strategies combining bone formation enhancers and bone resorption inhibitors may deserve evaluation. SN - 1297-319X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16242373/Bone_loss_associated_with_anorexia_nervosa_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1297-319X(04)00175-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -