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Pain-related fear at the start of a new low back pain episode.
Eur J Pain. 2005 Dec; 9(6):635-41.EJ

Abstract

Previous research supports the fear-avoidance model in explaining chronic low back pain (LBP) disability. The aims of the present study were to determine: (1) whether fear-avoidance model variables are associated already during acute stages of LBP and (2) whether (increases in) pain-related fear are associated with other patient characteristics routinely assessed by the General Practitioner (GP). General practice patients consulting because of a new episode of LBP completed questionnaires on pain-related fear, avoidance, pain and disability. A sample of 247 acute LBP patients (median duration of current episode was 5 days) was collected. Significant associations were found between pain intensity, pain-related fear, avoidance behaviour and disability, but correlations were generally modest. A strong association was found between pain and disability. Pain-related fear was slightly higher in patients reporting low job satisfaction and in those taking bedrest. These results suggest that the fear-avoidance model as it was developed and tested in chronic LBP, might not entirely apply to acute LBP patients. Future research should focus on the transition from acute to chronic LBP and the shifts that take place between fear-avoidance model associations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Practice, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. judith.sieben@hag.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16246816

Citation

Sieben, Judith M., et al. "Pain-related Fear at the Start of a New Low Back Pain Episode." European Journal of Pain (London, England), vol. 9, no. 6, 2005, pp. 635-41.
Sieben JM, Portegijs PJ, Vlaeyen JW, et al. Pain-related fear at the start of a new low back pain episode. Eur J Pain. 2005;9(6):635-41.
Sieben, J. M., Portegijs, P. J., Vlaeyen, J. W., & Knottnerus, J. A. (2005). Pain-related fear at the start of a new low back pain episode. European Journal of Pain (London, England), 9(6), 635-41.
Sieben JM, et al. Pain-related Fear at the Start of a New Low Back Pain Episode. Eur J Pain. 2005;9(6):635-41. PubMed PMID: 16246816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pain-related fear at the start of a new low back pain episode. AU - Sieben,Judith M, AU - Portegijs,Piet J M, AU - Vlaeyen,Johan W S, AU - Knottnerus,J André, Y1 - 2005/01/20/ PY - 2004/05/25/received PY - 2004/12/20/accepted PY - 2005/10/26/pubmed PY - 2006/2/25/medline PY - 2005/10/26/entrez SP - 635 EP - 41 JF - European journal of pain (London, England) JO - Eur J Pain VL - 9 IS - 6 N2 - Previous research supports the fear-avoidance model in explaining chronic low back pain (LBP) disability. The aims of the present study were to determine: (1) whether fear-avoidance model variables are associated already during acute stages of LBP and (2) whether (increases in) pain-related fear are associated with other patient characteristics routinely assessed by the General Practitioner (GP). General practice patients consulting because of a new episode of LBP completed questionnaires on pain-related fear, avoidance, pain and disability. A sample of 247 acute LBP patients (median duration of current episode was 5 days) was collected. Significant associations were found between pain intensity, pain-related fear, avoidance behaviour and disability, but correlations were generally modest. A strong association was found between pain and disability. Pain-related fear was slightly higher in patients reporting low job satisfaction and in those taking bedrest. These results suggest that the fear-avoidance model as it was developed and tested in chronic LBP, might not entirely apply to acute LBP patients. Future research should focus on the transition from acute to chronic LBP and the shifts that take place between fear-avoidance model associations. SN - 1090-3801 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16246816/Pain_related_fear_at_the_start_of_a_new_low_back_pain_episode_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1090-3801(04)00173-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -